Tag Archives: time series

Spatial and Temporal Viz of Gas Price, in France

A great think in France, is that we can play with a great database with gas price, in all gas stations, almost eveyday. The file is rather big, so let’s make sure we have enough memory to run our codes,

> rm(list=ls())

To extract the data, first, we should extract the xml file, and then convert it in a more common R object (say a list)

> year=2014
> loc=paste("http://donnees.roulez-eco.fr/opendata/annee/",year,sep="")
> download.file(loc,destfile="oil.zip")

Content type 'application/zip' length 15248088 bytes (14.5 MB)

> unzip("oil.zip", exdir="./")
> fichier=paste("PrixCarburants_annuel_",year,
> library(plyr)
> library(XML)
> library(lubridate)
> l=xmlToList(fichier)

We have a large dataset, with prices, for various types of gaz, for almost any gas station in France, almost every day, in 2014. It is a 1.4Gb list, with 11,064 elements (each of them being a gas station)

> length(l)
[1] 11064

There are two ways to look at the data. A first idea is to consider a gas station, and to extract the time series.

> time_series=function(no,type_gas="Gazole"){
+   prix=list()
+   date=list()
+   nom=list()
+   j=0
+   for(i in 1:length(l[[no]])){
+     v=names(l[[no]])
+     if(!is.null(v[i])){
+       if(v[i]=="prix"){
+         j=j+1
+  date[[j]]=as.character(l[[no]][[i]]["maj"])
+  prix[[j]]=as.character(l[[no]][[i]]["valeur"])
+  nom[[j]]=as.character(l[[no]][[i]]["nom"])
+       }}
+   }
+   id=which(unlist(nom)==type_gas)
+   n=length(id)
+   jour=function(j) as.Date(substr(date[[id[j]]],1,10),"%Y-%m-%d")
+   jour_heure=function(j) as.POSIXct(substr(date[[id[j]]],1,19), format = "%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S", tz = "UTC")
+   ext_y=function(j) substr(date[[id[j]]],1,4)
+   ext_m=function(j) substr(date[[id[j]]],6,7)
+   ext_d=function(j) substr(date[[id[j]]],9,10)
+   ext_h=function(j) substr(date[[id[j]]],12,13)
+   ext_mn=function(j) substr(date[[id[j]]],15,16)
+   prix_essence=function(i) as.numeric(prix[[id[i]]])/1000
+   base1=data.frame(indice=no,
+            id=l[[no]]$.attrs["id"],
+            adresse=l[[no]]$adresse,
+            ville=l[[no]]$ville,
+  lat=as.numeric(l[[no]]$.attrs["latitude"])
+  lon=as.numeric(l[[no]]$.attrs["longitude"])
+       cp=l[[no]]$.attrs["cp"],
+       saufjour=l[[no]]$ouverture["saufjour"], 
+       Y=unlist(lapply(1:n,ext_y)),
+       M=unlist(lapply(1:n,ext_m)),
+       D=unlist(lapply(1:n,ext_d)),
+       H=unlist(lapply(1:n,ext_h)),
+       MN=unlist(lapply(1:n,ext_mn)),
+    prix=unlist(lapply(1:n,prix_essence)))
+   base1=base1[!is.na(base1$prix),]
+   date_d=paste(year,"-01-01 12:00:00",sep="")
+   date_f=paste(year,"-12-31 12:00:00",sep="")
+   vecteur_date=seq(as.POSIXct(date_d, format =
+                 "%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S"),
+                    as.POSIXct(date_f, format = 
+                 "%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S"),by="days")
+   date=paste(base1$Y,"-",base1$M,"-",base1$D,
+   " ",base1$H,":",base1$MN,":00",sep="")
+   date_base=as.POSIXct(date, format = 
+                "%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S", tz = "UTC")
+   idx=function(t) sum(vecteur_date[t]>=date_base)
+   vect_idx=Vectorize(idx)(1:length(vecteur_date))
+   P=c(NA,base1$prix)
+   base2=ts(P[1+vect_idx],
+         start=year,frequency=365)
+   list(base=base1,
+        ts=base2)
+ }

To get the time series, extrapolation is necessary, since we have here observation at irregular dates. Here, for instance, for the second gas station, we get

> plot(time_series(2)$ts,ylim=c(1,1.6),col="red")
> lines(time_series(2,"SP98")$ts,col="blue")

An alternative is to study gas price from a spatial perspective. Given a date, we want the price in all stations. As previously, we keep the last price observed, in each station,

> spatial=function(dt){
+   base=NULL
+   for(no in 1:length(l)){  
+     prix=list()
+     date=list()
+     j=0
+     for(i in 1:length(l[[no]])){
+     v=names(l[[no]])
+     if(!is.null(v[i])){
+       if(v[i]=="prix"){
+   j=j+1
+   date[[j]]=as.character(l[[no]][[i]]["maj"])
+       }}
+   }
+   n=j
+   D=as.Date(substr(unlist(date),1,10),"%Y-%m-%d")
+   k=which(D==D[which.max(D[D<=dt])])
+ if(length(k)>0){
+   B=Vectorize(function(i) l[[no]][[k[i]]])(1:length(k))
+ if("nom" %in%  rownames(B)){  
+   k=which(B["nom",]=="Gazole")
+   prix=as.numeric(B["valeur",k])/1000
+   if(length(prix)==0) prix=NA
+   base1=data.frame(indice=no,
+   lat=as.numeric(l[[no]]$.attrs["latitude"])
+   lon=as.numeric(l[[no]]$.attrs["longitude"])
+   gaz=prix)
+   base=rbind(base,base1)
+ }}}
+ return(base)}

For instance, for the 5th of May, 2014, we get the following dataset

> B=spatial(as.Date("2014-05-05"))

To visualize prices, consider only mainland France (excluding islands in the Pacific, or close to the Caribeans)

> idx=which((B$lon>(-10))&(B$lon<20)&
+ (B$lat>35)&(B$lat<55))
> B=B[idx,]
> Q=quantile(B$gaz,seq(0,1,by=.01),na.rm=TRUE)
> Q[1]=0
> x=as.numeric(cut(B$gaz,breaks=unique(Q)))
> CL=c(rgb(0,0,1,seq(1,0,by=-.025)),
+ rgb(1,0,0,seq(0,1,by=.025)))
> plot(B$lon,B$lat,pch=19,col=CL[x])

Red dots are the most expensive gas stations, that particular day.

If we add contours of the French regions, we get

> library(maps)
> map("france")
> points(B$lon,B$lat,pch=19,col=CL[x])


We can also focus on some specific region, say the South of Brittany.

> library(OpenStreetMap)
> map <- openmap(c(lat= 48,   lon= -3),
+                c(lat= 47,   lon= -2))
> map <- openproj(map) 
> plot(map)
> points(B$lon,B$lat,pch=19,col=CL[x])

As we can see on that map, there are regions that are rather empty, where the closest gas station might be a bit far away. Actually, it is possible to add Voronoi sets on the map,

> dB=data.frame(lon=B$lon,lat=B$lat)
> idx=which(!duplicated(dB))
> dB=dB[idx,]


which could help to get the price of the closest gaz station.

> library(tripack)
> V <- voronoi.mosaic(dB$lon[id],dB$lat[id])
> plot(V,add=TRUE)

It is possible to plot each polygon with the color of the gaz station we add. Actually, it is a bit tricky, and I could not find a R function to to this. So I did it manually,

> plot(map)
> P <- voronoi.polygons(V)
> library(sp)
> point_in_i=function(i,point) point.in.polygon(point[1],point[2],P[[i]][,1],P[[i]][,2])
> which_point=function(i) which(Vectorize(function(j) point_in_i(i,c(dB$lon[id[j]],dB$lat[id[j]])))(1:length(id))>0)
> for(i in 1:length(P)) polygon(P[[i]],col=CL[x[id[which_point(i)]]],border=NA)

With this map, we can see that we have blue areas, i.e. all stations in a given area are cheap (because of competition), but in some places, a very expensive one is next to a very cheap one. I guess we should look closer at the dynamics… [to be continued….]

Vector Autoregressive Models

Consider here some https://latex.codecogs.com/gif.latex?VAR(1) model,


We’ve seen in class that stationnarity of that time series, in the sense that https://latex.codecogs.com/gif.latex?\mathbb{E}[\boldsymbol{Y}_t]=\boldsymbol{\mu} and https://latex.codecogs.com/gif.latex?\text{Var}[\boldsymbol{Y}_t,\boldsymbol{Y}_{t-h}]=\boldsymbol{\Gamma}(h), was valid if the roots (in https://latex.codecogs.com/gif.latex?\mathbb{C}) of the characteristic polyonomial –https://latex.codecogs.com/gif.latex?P(z)=\text{det}(\mathbb{I}-\boldsymbol{A}z) – were outside the unit circle.

To visualize this point, consider the following time series


To generate that time series, we need to generate a bivariate white noise, i.e. https://latex.codecogs.com/gif.latex?\text{Var}(\boldsymbol{\varepsilon}_t)=\boldsymbol{\Sigma} (not necessarily a diagonal matrix), and https://latex.codecogs.com/gif.latex?\text{Var}(\boldsymbol{\varepsilon}_t,\boldsymbol{\varepsilon}_{t-h})=\boldsymbol{0}. For instance

> n=500
> r=0.7
> set.seed(1)
> Z1=rnorm(n)
> Z2=rnorm(n)
> E1=Z1
> E2=r*Z1+sqrt(1-r^2)*Z2

To generate now our time series, use

> A=matrix(c(.7,.2,.4,.3),2,2)
> X1=X2=rep(0,n)
> for(t in 2:n){
+   X1[t]=A[1,1]*X1[t-1]+A[1,2]*X2[t-1]+E1[t]
+   X2[t]=A[2,1]*X1[t-1]+A[2,2]*X2[t-1]+E2[t]  
+ }

Here, we have

> plot(X1,type="l",col="red")
> lines(X2,col="blue")

Those two time series seem to be stationnary. And, indeed,

> polyroot(c(1,-sum(diag(A)),det(A)))
[1] 1.18+0i 6.51-0i
> Mod(polyroot(c(1,-sum(diag(A)),det(A))))
[1] 1.18 6.51

Continue reading Vector Autoregressive Models

Graduate Course on Time Series

This Winter, I will be giving a (graduate) course on time series, MAT8181. It is an ISM course, and even if it will probably be given in French, I will upload information here, in English. I will upload the (detailed) syllabus of the course during the Christmas holidays. But to give an overview, for those willing to register, the first part of the course will focus on linear models, univariate and then multivariate. The references for this first part are

In the second part, we will introcue non-linear models, used in financial econometrics, from ARCH to GARCH, as well as stochastic volatility models. The references for this second part are

[a pdf version can be found on Eric Zivot’s webpage]

Specific references and more details about the chapters will be given during the course. I will upload exercises this winter, as well as a list of articles that will be used for projects. Examples will be illustrated using R functions from dedicated packages.

Grades will be based on exercises (homework), report (based on a published paper) and final writen exam.

A random walk ? What else ?

Consider the following time series,

What does it look like ? I know, this is a stupid game, but I keep using it in my time series courses. It does look like a random walk, doesn’t it ? If we use Philipps-Perron test, yes, it does,

> PP.test(x)

	Phillips-Perron Unit Root Test

data:  x 
Dickey-Fuller = -2.2421, Truncation lag parameter = 6, p-value = 0.4758

If we look at the autocorrelation function, we do observe some persistence,

> acf(x,100)

Perhaps this persistence can be related to long range dependence, or to some fractional random walk. A natural idea could be estimate Hurst parameter, using for instance Beran (1992) estimator – based on Whittle (1956) – where we assume that the autocorrelation function satisfies

as  for some  (the so called Hurst index). But here, we start to observe unexpected ouputs,

> library(longmemo)
> (d  <- WhittleEst(x))
'WhittleEst' Whittle estimator for  fractional Gaussian noise ('fGn');	 call:
WhittleEst(x = x)
	  time series of length  n = 759.

H = 0.9899335
coefficients 'eta' =
    Estimate Std. Error z value   Pr(>|z|)
H 0.98993350 0.02468323 40.1055 < 2.22e-16
 <==> d := H - 1/2 = 0.49 (0.025)

 $ vcov       : num [1, 1] 0.000609
  ..- attr(*, "dimnames")=List of 2
  .. ..$ : chr "H"
  .. ..$ : chr "H"
 $ periodogr.x: num [1:379] 1479.3 1077.3 371.7 287.2 51.2 ...
 $ spec       : num [1:379] 62.5 31.7 21.3 16.1 12.9 ...

or more precisely some non-expected values for Hurst parameter, which should be in 

> confint(d)
      2.5 %   97.5 %
H 0.9415553 1.038312

Oops, perhaps, we did miss something, because it looks like there is extremely strong persistence on our time series,

> plot(d)

It is probablty time to ask where I found that series… To be honest, I did borrow  it from a great canadian website http://climate.weatheroffice.gc.ca/climateData/. For instance, it you want the temperature we did experience a few days ago, you can use

> Y=2013
> M=1
> D=25
> url=paste(
> page=scan(url,what="character")

Yes, that series is the temperature we did experience in Montréal last month (hourly time seies). On the graph below, you can actually compare it with temperature experienced in Januarys over the past 60 years,

So it is not that surprising to see long range dependence models appearing (I did write a paper on that topic precisely a few years ago). What I found puzzeling is that persistence is large, extremely large. And the problem is that I do not see how we can explain ‘jumps’ that we do observe on that series. For instance the behavior of the series while I was in Europe, before January 20th: within 3 days, the temperature went down, from 0°C to -20°C, and up from -20°C to 0°C, and then down again, from 0°C to -20°C (a nice И if we use cyrillic letters). Or how can we explain the oscillating behavior observed the week after, where the temperature went up, from -25°C to (almost) +10°C in a few days. Within 10 days, we did observe also two ‘jumps’ (or ‘crashes‘ if we want to use the terminology of financial time series) with a decrease of 25 degrees in less than 24 hours ! Obviously, we need to find other classes of model to replicate that kind of behavior we observe on temperatures…

Modélisation et prévision, cas d’école

Quelques lignes de code que l’on reprendra au prochain cours, avec une transformation en log, et une tendance linéaire. Considérons la recherche du mot clé headphones, au Canada, la base est en ligne sur l’ancien blog, à l’adresse freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/…

> report=read.table(
+ "report-headphones.csv",
+ skip=4,header=TRUE,sep=",",nrows=464)
> source("http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/code/H2M.R")
> headphones=H2M(report,lang="FR",type="ts")
> plot(headphones)

Mais le modèle linéaire ne devrait pas convenir, car la série explose,

> n=length(headphones)
> X1=seq(12,n,by=12)
> Y1=headphones[X1]
> points(time(headphones)[X1],Y1,pch=19,col="red")
> X2=seq(6,n,by=12)
> Y2=headphones[X2]
> points(time(headphones)[X2],Y2,pch=19,col="blue")

Il est alors naturel de prendre le logarithme de la série,

> plot(headphones,log="y")

C’est cette série que l’on va modéliser (mais c’est bien entendu la première série, au final, qu’il faudra prévoir). On commence par ôter la tendance (ici linéaire)

> X=as.numeric(headphones)
> Y=log(X)
> n=length(Y)
> T=1:n
> B=data.frame(Y,T)
> reg=lm(Y~T,data=B)
> plot(T,Y,type="l")
> lines(T,predict(reg),col="purple",lwd=2)

On travaille alors sur la série résiduelle.

> Z=Y-predict(reg)
> acf(Z,lag=36,lwd=6)
> pacf(Z,lag=36,lwd=6)

On peut tenter de différencier de manière saisonnière,

> DZ=diff(Z,12)
> acf(DZ,lag=36,lwd=6)
> pacf(DZ,lag=36,lwd=6)

On ajuste alors un processus ARIMA, sur la série différenciée,

> mod=arima(DZ,order=c(1,0,0),
+ seasonal=list(order=c(1,0,0),period=12))
> mod

ar1     sar1  intercept
0.7937  -0.3696     0.0032
s.e.  0.0626   0.1072     0.0245

sigma^2 estimated as 0.0046:  log likelihood = 119.47

Mais comme c’est la série de base qui nous intéresse, on utilise une écriture SARIMA,

> mod=arima(Z,order=c(1,0,0),
+ seasonal=list(order=c(1,1,0),period=12))

On fait alors la prévision de cette série.

> modpred=predict(mod,24)
> Zm=modpred$pred
> Zse=modpred$se

On utilise aussi le prolongement de la tendance linéaire,

> tendance=predict(reg,newdata=data.frame(T=n+(1:24)))

Pour revenir enfin à notre série initiale, on utilise les propriétés de la loi lognormales, et plus particulièrement la forme de la moyenne, pour prédire la valeur de la série,

> Ym=exp(Zm+tendance+Zse^2/2)

Graphiquement, on a

> plot(1:n,X,xlim=c(1,n+24),type="l",ylim=c(10,90))
> lines(n+(1:24),Ym,lwd=2,col="blue")

Pour les intervalles de confiance, on peut utiliser les quantiles de la loi lognormale,

> Ysup975=qlnorm(.975,meanlog=Zm+tendance,sdlog=Zse)
> Yinf025=qlnorm(.025,meanlog=Zm+tendance,sdlog=Zse)
> Ysup9=qlnorm(.9,meanlog=Zm+tendance,sdlog=Zse)
> Yinf1=qlnorm(.1,meanlog=Zm+tendance,sdlog=Zse)
> polygon(c(n+(1:24),rev(n+(1:24))),
+ c(Ysup975,rev(Yinf025)),col="orange",border=NA)
> polygon(c(n+(1:24),rev(n+(1:24))),
+ c(Ysup9,rev(Yinf1)),col="yellow",border=NA)

Introduction aux séries temporelles

Nous allons commencer demain la modélisation des séries temporelles. Les transparents de la séance sont en ligne ici. Je rappelle que les notes de cours (complètes) sont également en ligne, . Je continuerai à poster régulièrement des billets contenant des commandes R.

Au programme cette semaine, l’utilisation des méthodes de régression pour extraire tendance et cycle, le lissage exponentielle (simple, double et saisonnier), et une présentation des notions importantes dans le cours (stationnarité, autocorrélations, bruit blanc, etc).

Inference and autoregressive processes

Consider a (stationary) autoregressive process, say of order 2,

for some white noise  with variance . Here is a code to generate such a process,

> phi1=.5
> phi2=-.4
> sigma=1.5
> set.seed(1)
> n=240
> WN=rnorm(n,sd=sigma)
> Z=rep(NA,n)
> Z[1:2]=rnorm(2,0,1)
> for(t in 3:n){Z[t]=phi1*Z[t-1]+phi2*Z[t-2]+WN[t]}

Here, we have to estimate two sets of parameters: the autoregressive coefficients, and the variance of the innovation process . There are (at least) three techniques to estimate those parameters.

  • using least square regression

A natural idea is to see here a regression model, and thus, if we consider a matrix formulation,

Here we can run (conditional) ordinary least squares estimation,

> base=data.frame(Y=Z[3:n],X1=Z[2:(n-1)],X2=Z[1:(n-2)])
> regression=lm(Y~0+X1+X2,data=base)
> summary(regression)

lm(formula = Y ~ 0 + X1 + X2, data = base)

Min      1Q  Median      3Q     Max
-4.3491 -0.8890 -0.0762  0.9601  3.6105

Estimate Std. Error t value Pr(>|t|)
X1  0.45107    0.05924   7.615 6.34e-13 ***
X2 -0.41454    0.05924  -6.998 2.67e-11 ***
Signif. codes:  0 ‘***’ 0.001 ‘**’ 0.01 ‘*’ 0.05 ‘.’ 0.1 ‘ ’ 1

Residual standard error: 1.449 on 236 degrees of freedom
Multiple R-squared: 0.2561,	Adjusted R-squared: 0.2497
F-statistic: 40.61 on 2 and 236 DF,  p-value: 6.949e-16

> regression$coefficients
X1         X2
0.4510703 -0.4145365
> summary(regression)$sigma
[1] 1.449276
  • using Yule-Walker equations

As we’ve seen in class, we can easily get the following equations for the autocovariance functions,

which can also be written

So we just have to solve a simple linear system of equations. Note that if we divide by the variance, those equations can be written in terms of the autocorrelation functions

The code is the following

> rho1=cor(Z[1:(n-1)],Z[2:n])
> rho2=cor(Z[1:(n-2)],Z[3:n])
> A=matrix(c(1,rho1,rho1,1),2,2)
> b=matrix(c(rho1,rho2),2,1)
> (PHI=solve(A,b))
[1,]  0.4517579
[2,] -0.4155920

Now, we need to extract the estimated innovation process, from this set of parameters (note that it could be possible to include the variance term in Yule-Walker equations, to get a three dimensional linear equation)

> estWN=base$Y-(PHI[1]*base$X1+PHI[2]*base$X2)
> sd(estWN)
[1] 1.445706

This estimator is probably not the best one (we can take into account that we’ve lost two degrees of freedom), but as a starting point, let us consider this one.

  • using (conditional) likelihood estimators

Finally, we can assume some distribution for the innovation process. Thestandard model is a Gaussian model, i.e.

In that case, the conditional log likelihood (conditional since we set the first two observations here) is

> CondLogLik=function(A,TS){
+ phi1=A[1];  phi2=A[2]
+ sigma=A[3]	; L=0
+ for(t in 3:length(TS)){
+ L=L+dnorm(TS[t],mean=phi1*TS[t-1]+
+ phi2*TS[t-2],sd=sigma,log=TRUE)}
+ return(-L)}

Now, we can run standard optimization procedures,

> LogL=function(A) CondLogLik(A,TS=Z)
> optim(c(0,0,1),LogL)
[1]  0.4509685 -0.4144938  1.4430930

[1] 425.0164

function gradient
88       NA

[1] 0


Here, our three estimators are rather close. Actually, if we generate 1,000 time series (of size 240), those are the Box-plots of our three estimators, for the first order autoregressive coefficient

for the second one,

and finally for the standard deviation of the innovation process

All those estimators behave nicely, and are rather close. Note that they all might be biased, but they are consistent (see Davidson and MacKinnon for instance, in their book, for more details).

Notes de cours sur les séries temporelles

La session d’hiver n’étant pas terminée, je vais poster mes notes de cours sur la dernière section (sur la modélisation de séries temporelles) pour le cours ACT2040. Il s’agit – comme je l’avais dit en cours – d’une remise au goût du jour de notes tapées il y a une dizaine d’années. J’ai également rajouté du code R, mais il doit resté un certain nombre de coquilles et de fautes de frappe. Je profiterais des jours qui viennent pour réviser cette version.

Différencier (indéfiniment) les séries temporelles ?

Dans un mail, un étudiant qui finissait son projet de séries temporelles m’a posé une question simple et intéressante  (que je me permets de reprendre ici): “quand on cherche à stationnariser une série, on a souvent  besoin de différencier deux fois, et ça marche tout le temps“.
Effectivement, on peut toujours différencier une série, on finira bien par tomber sur une série stationnaire. Je retraduirais cette question sous la forme suivante “pourquoi cherche-t-on toujours à stationnariser les séries ?” ou encore “est-ce gênant de différencier une série ?“.
Pour la première question, la réponse est simple: les seules séries que l’on sache modéliser sont les séries stationnaires. Les autocorrélations se calculent sur des séries stationnaires, par exemple, et la non-stationnarité n’est pas une notion simple à définir (tout comme la non-indépendance entre variables aléatoires)…..etc.
Pour la seconde question, la réponse est simple: si on différencie une série pour mieux la modéliser, si on souhaite par la suite faire de la prévision, il conviendra d’intégrer la série modélisée. Or intégrer une série fait exploser l’intervalle de confiance. Autant faire ça sur un exemple simple, avec la série suivante, que l’on commence par supposer stationnaire, et que l’on prédit sur une trentaine de valeurs, avec un intervalle de confiance.

Mais si l’on suppose la série intégrée à l’ordre 1, on différencie puis on modélise par un processus stationnaire (c’est l’idée qui sous-tend les processus ARIMA, à savoir un processus ARMA intégré: en différenciant la série, on devrait tomber sur un processus ARMA. On peut rattacher ça à la notion de racine unité). La prédiction (avec l’intervalle de confiance) est alors présenté sur la série initiale. Le fait d’intégrer les erreurs fait que la variance de la prédiction augmente avec l’horizon.

Et si l’on continue, et que l’on différencie de fois la série avant de la modéliser, et que l’on intègre deux fois les erreurs, l’intervalle de confiance devient immense !

Bref, il convient de ne pas différencier si ce n’est pas vraiment indispensable ! L’outil pour vérifier que l’on n’a pas trop différencier est la fonction d’autocovariance inverse (c’est à dire la fonction d’autocovariance d’une série dont la densité spectrale serait l’inverse de la densité spectrale initiale*). Cette fonction fait partie des fonctions de base sous SAS, mais pas sous R… J’ai cherché un peu, mais sans succès. L’argument dans les forums est que cette fonction est redondante avec la fonction d’autocorrélation partielle. Et en effet, si la finalité est simplement de détecter les ordres AR ou MA d’une série stationnaire, alors effectivement, les deux fonctions s’utilisent de manière équivalente. Mais la fonction d’autocovariance inverse apporte plus d’information, en particulier afin de détecter si l’on n’a pas surdifférencié la série.
La sortie suivante présente la fonction d’autocorrélation (à gauche) et la fonction d’autocorrélation inverse (à droite) sur une série.

On note que la série semble intégrée (en pratique, des autocorrélations très fortes et persistantes très longtemps se traduit par une suspission d’intégration). Si l’on différencie la série, on obtient les autocorrélogrammes suivants,

Et si l’on différencie une nouvelle fois, on obtient les graphiques suivants,

Bref, l’autocorrélogramme de droite semble caractéristique d’une série intégrée: on dira alors que l’on a surdifférencié le modèle (“en intégrant la série, elle est toujours stationnaires”…). Je parle un peu de tout ça dans mon polycopié de Dauphine, tome 1.

* J’avais parlé dans un ancien billet (ici) de l’importance de la densité spectrale en série temporelles. L’idée est que si f est une densité spectrale, 1/f peut également l’être. Le lien entre la fonction d’autocorrélation et la densité spectrale est donné par des théorèmes de Kolmogorov ou Wiener. Pour plus de détails, il y a des compléments dans le chapitre 1.2 du polycopié que j’avais fait à Dauphine (ici). On peut d’ailleurs noter que la fonction d’autocorrélation partielle d’un processus ARMA(p,q) est la fonction d’autocorrélation d’un processus ARMA(q,p) obtenu en permutant les deux polynômes d’opérateurs retard.