Multivariate probit regression using (direct) maximum likelihood estimators

Consider a random pair http://freakonometrics.hypotheses.org/files/2015/12/biv-prob-01.gif of binary responses, i.e. http://freakonometrics.hypotheses.org/files/2015/12/biv-prob-02.gif with http://freakonometrics.hypotheses.org/files/2015/12/biv-prob-03.gif taking values 1 or 2. Assume that probability http://freakonometrics.hypotheses.org/files/2015/12/biv-prob-04.gif can be function of some covariates.

  • The Gaussian vector latent structure

A standard model is based a latent Gaussian structure, i.e. there exists some random vector http://freakonometrics.hypotheses.org/files/2015/12/biv-prob-06.gif such that http://freakonometrics.hypotheses.org/files/2015/12/biv-prob-07.gif if http://freakonometrics.hypotheses.org/files/2015/12/biv-prob-08.gif is lower than a given threshold, and 1 otherwise.
As in standard probit models, assume that

http://freakonometrics.hypotheses.org/files/2015/12/biv-prob-09.gif

where we can assume that http://freakonometrics.hypotheses.org/files/2015/12/biv-prob-10.gif is a Gaussian random vector. This assumption can be used to derive the likelihood of a sample http://freakonometrics.hypotheses.org/files/2015/12/biv-prob-11.gif.

> logV=function(parameter){
+ CORRELATION=parameter[1]
+ BETA=matrix(parameter[2:length(parameter)],ncol(Y),ncol(X))
+ z=cbind(X%*%(BETA[1,]),X%*%(BETA[2,]))
+ sigma=matrix(c(1,CORRELATION,CORRELATION,1),2,2)
+     a11=pmnorm(z[1,],rep(0,ncol(Y)),varcov=sigma)
+ for(i in 2:nrow(z)){a11=c(a11,pmnorm(z[i,],rep(0,ncol(Y)),varcov=sigma))}
+     a10=pnorm(z[1,1],sd=sqrt(sigma[1,1]))-pmnorm(z[1,],varcov=sigma)
+ for(i in
+ 2:nrow(z)){a10=c(a10,pnorm(z[i,1],sd=sqrt(sigma[1,1]))-pmnorm(z[i,],varcov=sigma))}
+     a01=pnorm(z[1,2],sd=sqrt(sigma[2,2]))-pmnorm(z[1,],varcov=sigma)
+ for(i in
+ 2:nrow(z)){a01=c(a01,pnorm(z[i,2],sd=sqrt(sigma[2,2]))-pmnorm(z[i,],varcov=sigma))}
+     a00=1-a10-a01-a11
+ -sum(((Y[,1]==1)&(Y[,2]==1))*log(a11) +
+     1*log(a01) +
+     2*log(a10) +
+     3*log(a00) )
+ }
> OPT=optim(fn=logV,par=c(0,1,1,1,1,1,1),method="BFGS")$par

(the code is a bit long since I had trouble working properly with matrices – or more precisely to vectorize my functions – so I used loops… I am sure it is possible to write a better code).
It is possible to generate samples (based on that specific model) to check that we can actually derive proper maximum likelihood estimators,

> library(mnormt)
> set.seed(1)
> n=1000
> r=0.5
> X1=runif(n)
> X2=rnorm(n)
> Y1S=1+5*X1
> Y2S=8-5*X1
> RES=rmnorm(n,mean=c(0,0),varcov=matrix(c(1,r,r,1),2,2))
> YS=cbind(Y1S,Y2S)+RES
> Y1=(YS[,1]>quantile(YS[,1],.5))*1
> Y2=(YS[,2]>quantile(YS[,2],.5))*1
> base=data.frame(i,Y1,Y2,X1,X2,YS)
> head(base)
  i Y1 Y2        X1          X2      Y1S      Y2S
1 1  0  0 0.2655087  0.07730312 3.177587 5.533884
2 2  0  0 0.3721239 -0.29686864 1.935307 5.089524
3 3  1  0 0.5728534 -1.18324224 4.757848 5.172584
4 4  1  0 0.9082078  0.01129269 4.600029 3.878225
5 5  0  1 0.2016819  0.99160104 2.547362 6.743714
6 6  1  0 0.8983897  1.59396745 5.309974 4.421523

(the two columns on the right are latent observations, that cannot be used since theoretically they are unobservable). Note that it is a simple regression, one of the component is here only to bring some noise. First of all, let us look at marginal probit regression

>  reg1=glm(Y1~X1+X2,data=base,family=binomial)
>  reg2=glm(Y2~X1+X2,data=base,family=binomial)
> summary(reg1)
 
Call:
glm(formula = Y1 ~ X1 + X2, family = binomial, data = base)
 
Deviance Residuals:
Min        1Q    Median        3Q       Max
-2.90570  -0.50126  -0.00266   0.49162   2.78256
 
Coefficients:
Estimate Std. Error z value Pr(>|z|)
(Intercept) -4.291725   0.267149 -16.065   <2e-16 
X1           8.656836   0.510153  16.969   <2e-16 ***
X2           0.007375   0.090530   0.081    0.935
---
Signif. codes:  0 '***' 0.001 '**' 0.01 '*' 0.05 '.' 0.1 ' ' 1
(Dispersion parameter for binomial family taken to be 1)
Null deviance: 1386.29  on 999  degrees of freedom
Residual deviance:  726.48  on 997  degrees of freedom
AIC: 732.48

Number of Fisher Scoring iterations: 5
> summary(reg2)
Call:
glm(formula = Y2 ~ X1 + X2, family = binomial, data = base)
Deviance Residuals:
Min        1Q    Median        3Q       Max
-2.74682  -0.51814  -0.00001   0.57969   2.58565
Coefficients:
Estimate Std. Error z value Pr(>|z|)
(Intercept)  3.91709    0.24399  16.054   <2e-16 ***
X1          -7.89703    0.46277 -17.065   <2e-16 ***
X2           0.18360    0.08758   2.096    0.036 *
---
Signif. codes:  0 '***' 0.001 '**' 0.01 '*' 0.05 '.' 0.1 ' ' 1
(Dispersion parameter for binomial family taken to be 1)

Null deviance: 1386.29  on 999  degrees of freedom
Residual deviance:  777.61  on 997  degrees of freedom
AIC: 783.61
Number of Fisher Scoring iterations: 5

Here, the optimization yields,

> OPT=optim(fn=logV,par=c(0,1,1,1,1,1,1),method="BFGS")$par
> OPT[1]
[1] 0.5261382
> matrix(OPT[2:7],2,3)
          [,1]      [,2]       [,3]
[1,] -2.451721  4.908633 0.01600769
[2,]  2.241962 -4.539946 0.10614807

Note that the coefficients we have obtained are almost identical to the ones obtained with R standard procedure,

>  library(Zelig)
>  REG= zelig(list(mu1=Y1~X1+X2,
+             mu2=Y2~X1+X2,
+     rho=~1),
+     model="bprobit",data=base)
>  summary(REG)
 
Call:
zelig(formula = list(mu1 = Y1 ~ X1 + X2, mu2 = Y2 ~ X1 + X2,
    rho = ~1), model = "bprobit", data = base)
 
Pearson Residuals:
                 Min        1Q     Median      3Q     Max
probit(mu1) -10.5442 -0.377243  0.0041803 0.36709 8.60398
probit(mu2)  -7.8547 -0.376888  0.0083715 0.42923 5.88264
rhobit(rho) -13.8322 -0.091502 -0.0080544 0.37218 0.85101
 
Coefficients:
                  Value Std. Error   t value
(Intercept):1 -2.451699   0.135369 -18.11116
(Intercept):2  2.241964   0.125072  17.92536
(Intercept):3  1.169461   0.189771   6.16249
X1:1           4.908617   0.252683  19.42602
X1:2          -4.539951   0.233632 -19.43203
X2:1           0.015992   0.050443   0.31703
X2:2           0.106154   0.049092   2.16235
 
Number of linear predictors:  3
 
Names of linear predictors: probit(mu1), probit(mu2), rhobit(rho)
&n
bsp;
Dispersion Parameter for binom2.rho family:   1
 
Residual Deviance: 1460.355 on 2993 degrees of freedom
 
Log-likelihood: -730.1774 on 2993 degrees of freedom
 
Number of Iterations: 3

> matrix(coefficients(REG)[c(1:2,4:7)],2,3)
          [,1]      [,2]       [,3]
[1,] -2.451699  4.908617 0.01599183
[2,]  2.241964 -4.539951 0.10615443

The correlation here is also the same

> (exp(summary(REG)@coef3[3])-1)/(exp(summary(REG)@coef3[3])+1)
[1] 0.5260951

That procedure works well an can be extended to ordinal responses (not only binary ones, or to three dimensional problems,

logV=function(beta){
BETA=matrix(beta[4:(3+ncol(Y)*ncol(X))],ncol(Y),ncol(X))
z=cbind(X%*%(BETA[1,]),X%*%(BETA[2,]),X%*%(BETA[3,]))
r12=beta[1]
r23=beta[2]
r31=beta[3]
s1=s2=s3=1
sigma=matrix(c(s1^2,r12*s1*s2,r31*s1*s3,
               r12*s1*s2,s2^2,r23*s2*s3,
               r31*s1*s3,r23*s2*s3,s3^2),3,3)
sigma1=matrix(c(s2^2,r23*s2*s3,
                r23*s2*s3,s3^2),2,2)
sigma2=matrix(c(s1^2,r31*s1*s3,
                r31*s1*s3,s3^2),2,2)
sigma3=matrix(c(s1^2,r12*s1*s2,
                r12*s1*s2,s2^2),2,2)
    a111=pmnorm(z[1,],rep(0,ncol(Y)),varcov=sigma)
for(i in 2:nrow(z)){a111=c(a111,pmnorm(z[i,],rep(0,ncol(Y)),varcov=sigma))}
    a011=pmnorm(z[1,2:3],varcov=sigma1)-pmnorm(z[1,],varcov=sigma)
for(i in 2:nrow(z)){a011=c(a011,pmnorm(z[i,2:3],varcov=sigma1)-pmnorm(z[i,],varcov=sigma))}
    a101=pmnorm(z[1,c(1,3)],varcov=sigma2)-pmnorm(z[1,],varcov=sigma)
for(i in 2:nrow(z)){a101=c(a101,pmnorm(z[i,c(1,3)],varcov=sigma2)-pmnorm(z[i,],varcov=sigma))}
    a110=pmnorm(z[1,1:2],varcov=sigma3)-pmnorm(z[1,],varcov=sigma)
for(i in 2:nrow(z)){a110=c(a110,pmnorm(z[i,1:2],varcov=sigma3)-pmnorm(z[i,],varcov=sigma))}
    a100=pnorm(z[1,1],sd=s1)-pmnorm(z[1,c(1,2)],varcov=sigma3)-pmnorm(z[1,c(1,3)],varcov=sigma2)+pmnorm(z[1,],rep(0,ncol(Y)),varcov=sigma)
for(i in 2:nrow(z)){a100=c(a100,pnorm(z[i,1],sd=s1)-pmnorm(z[i,c(1,2)],varcov=sigma3)-pmnorm(z[i,c(1,3)],varcov=sigma2)+pmnorm(z[i,],rep(0,ncol(Y)),varcov=sigma))}
    a010=pnorm(z[1,2],sd=s2)-pmnorm(z[1,c(1,2)],varcov=sigma3)-pmnorm(z[1,c(2,3)],varcov=sigma1)+pmnorm(z[1,],rep(0,ncol(Y)),varcov=sigma)
for(i in 2:nrow(z)){a010=c(a010,pnorm(z[i,2],sd=s2)-pmnorm(z[i,c(1,2)],varcov=sigma3)-pmnorm(z[i,c(2,3)],varcov=sigma1)+pmnorm(z[i,],rep(0,ncol(Y)),varcov=sigma))}
    a001=pnorm(z[1,3],sd=s3)-pmnorm(z[1,c(2,3)],varcov=sigma1)-pmnorm(z[1,c(1,3)],varcov=sigma2)+pmnorm(z[1,],rep(0,ncol(Y)),varcov=sigma)
for(i in 2:nrow(z)){a001=c(a001,pnorm(z[i,3],sd=s3)-pmnorm(z[i,c(2,3)],varcov=sigma1)-pmnorm(z[i,c(1,3)],varcov=sigma2)+pmnorm(z[i,],rep(0,ncol(Y)),varcov=sigma))}
    a000=1-a111-a011-a101-a110-a001-a010-a100
 
a111[a111<=0]=1e-50
a110[a110<=0]=1e-50
a101[a101<=0]=1e-50
a011[a011<=0]=1e-50
a100[a100<=0]=1e-50
a010[a010<=0]=1e-50
a001[a001<=0]=1e-50
a000[a000<=0]=1e-50
 
-sum(((Y[,1]==0)&(Y[,2]==0)&(Y[,3]==0))*log(a111) +
    4*log(a011) +
    5*log(a101) +
    6*log(a110) +
    7*log(a001) +
    8*log(a010) +
    9*log(a100) +
    10*log(a000) )
}

A strong assumption in that bivariate model is that residuals have a Gaussian structure. It is possible to change that assumption

  • marginally: for instance if we use a logistic cumulative distribution function, then we will have a bivariate logit regression
  • in terms of dependence structure: it is possible to consider another copula than the gaussian one, e.g. Gumbel’s copula (also called the bivariate logistic copula), or Clayton’s

Here, the following code can be used to extend the model to non Gaussian structures,

> F=function(x,r){pmnorm(x,rep(0,length(x)),
+                 varcov=matrix(c(1,r,r,1),2,2))}
> Fx=function(x1){F(c(x1,1e40),0)}
> Fy=function(x2){Fx(x2)}
> 
> logVgen=function(parameter){
+ CORRELATION=parameter[1]
+ BETA=matrix(parameter[2:length(parameter)],ncol(Y),ncol(X))
+ z=cbind(X%*%(BETA[1,]),X%*%(BETA[2,]))
+     a11=F(z[1,],r=CORRELATION)
+ for(i in 2:nrow(z)){a11=c(a11,F(z[i,],r=CORRELATION))}
+     a10=Fx(z[1,1])-F(z[1,],r=CORRELATION)
+ for(i in 2:nrow(z)){a10=c(a10,Fx(z[i,1])-F(z[i,],r=CORRELATION))}
+     a01=Fy(z[1,2])-F(z[1,],r=CORRELATION)
+ for(i in 2:nrow(z)){a01=c(a01,Fy(z[i,2])-F(z[i,],r=CORRELATION))}
+     a00=1-a10-a01-a11
+ -sum(((Y[,1]==1)&(Y[,2]==1))*log(a11) +
+     11*log(a01) +
+     12*log(a10) +
+     13*log(a00) )
+ }
>
> beta0=c(0,1,1,1,1,1,1)
> (OPT=optim(fn=logVgen,par=beta0,method="BFGS")$par)
[1]  0.52613820 -2.45172059  2.24196154  4.90863292 -4.53994592  0.01600769
[7]  0.10614807
There were 23 warnings (use warnings() to see them)

E.g.

> library(copula)
> F=function(x,r){pcopula(pnorm(x),
               claytonCopula(2, r))}
> Fx=function(x1){F(c(x1,1e40),0)
}
> Fy=function(x2){Fx(x2)}
  • An application to school tests

Consider the following dataset,

hsb2=read.table("http://freakonometrics.free.fr/hsb2.csv",
        header=TRUE, sep=",")
math_male=hsb2$math[female==0]
write_male=hsb2$write[female==0]
math_female=hsb2$math[female==1]
write_female=hsb2$write[female==1]
plot(math_female, write_female, type="p",
     pch=19,col="red",xlab="maths",ylab="writing",cex=.8)
points(math_male, write_male, cex=1.2, col="blue")

with here maths versus writing, with girls in red and boys in blue, where variables here are

  female :
    0: male
    1: female
  race :
    1: hispanic
    2: asian
    3: african-amer
    4: white
  ses :
    1: low
    2: middle
    3: high
  schtyp : type of school
    1: public
    2: private
  prog : type of program
    1: general
    2: academic
    3: vocation
  read : reading score
  write : writing score
  math : math score
  science : science score
  socst : social studies score

We can try to understand correlation between math and writing skills. Covariates can be the sex of the child, and his reading skills. The question will then be: are good students in maths and writing simply students that can read well ?

Here the code is simply

> W=hsb2$write>=50
> M=hsb2$math>=50
> base=data.frame(Y1=W,Y2=M,
+             X1=hsb2$female,X2=hsb2$read)
>
> library(Zelig)
> REG= zelig(list(mu1=Y1~X1+X2,
+             mu2=Y2~X1+X2,
+     rho=~1),
+     model="bprobit",data=base)
> summary(REG)
 
Call:
zelig(formula = list(mu1 = Y1 ~ X1 + X2, mu2 = Y2 ~ X1 + X2,
    rho = ~1), model = "bprobit", data = base)
 
Pearson Residuals:
                Min        1Q  Median      3Q    Max
probit(mu1) -4.7518 -0.502594 0.15038 0.53038 1.8592
probit(mu2) -3.4243 -0.653537 0.23673 0.67011 2.6072
rhobit(rho) -4.9821  0.010481 0.13500 0.40776 2.9171
 
Coefficients:
                  Value Std. Error  t value
(Intercept):1 -5.484711   0.787101 -6.96825
(Intercept):2 -4.061384   0.633781 -6.40818
(Intercept):3  1.332187   0.322175  4.13497
X1:1           1.125924   0.233550  4.82092
X1:2           0.167258   0.202498  0.82598
X2:1           0.103997   0.014662  7.09286
X2:2           0.082739   0.012026  6.88017
 
Number of linear predictors:  3
 
Names of linear predictors: probit(mu1), probit(mu2), rhobit(rho)
 
Dispersion Parameter for binom2.rho family:   1
 
Residual Deviance: 364.51 on 593 degrees of freedom
 
Log-likelihood: -182.255 on 593 degrees of freedom
 
Number of Iterations: 3
> (exp(summary(REG)@coef3[3])-1)/(exp(
summary(REG)@coef3[3])+1)
[1] 0.5824045

with a remaining correlation among residuals of 0.58. So with only the sex of the student, and his or her reading skill, we cannot explain the correlation between maths and writing skills. With our previous code, we have here

> beta0=c((exp(summary(REG)@coef3[3])-1)/(exp(summary(REG)@coef3[3])+1),
+      summary(REG)@coef3[c(1:2,4:7),1])
> beta0
              (Intercept):1 (Intercept):2          X1:1          X1:2
0.58240446   -5.48471133   -4.06138412    1.12592427    0.16725842
X2:1          X2:2
0.10399668    0.08273879
> (OPT=optim(fn=logV,par=beta0,method="BFGS")$par)
(Intercept):1 (Intercept):2          X1:1          X1:2
0.5824045    -5.4847113    -4.0613841     1.1259243     0.1672584
X2:1          X2:2
0.1039967     0.0827388

i.e. we obtain (almost) exactly the same estimators. But here I have used as starting values for the optimization procedure the estimators given by R. If we change them, hopefully we have a robust maximum likelihood estimator,

> (OPT=optim(fn=logV,par=beta0/2,method="BFGS")$par)
              (Intercept):1 (Intercept):2          X1:1          X1:2
   0.58233360   -5.49428984   -4.06839571    1.12696594    0.16760347
         X2:1          X2:2
   0.10417767    0.08287409
There were 12 warnings (use warnings() to see them)

So once again, it is possible to optimize numerically a likelihood function, and it works.

  1. Y[,1]==0)&(Y[,2]==1 []
  2. Y[,1]==1)&(Y[,2]==0 []
  3. Y[,1]==0)&(Y[,2]==0 []
  4. Y[,1]==1)&(Y[,2]==0)&(Y[,3]==0 []
  5. Y[,1]==0)&(Y[,2]==1)&(Y[,3]==0 []
  6. Y[,1]==0)&(Y[,2]==0)&(Y[,3]==1 []
  7. Y[,1]==1)&(Y[,2]==1)&(Y[,3]==0 []
  8. Y[,1]==1)&(Y[,2]==0)&(Y[,3]==1 []
  9. Y[,1]==0)&(Y[,2]==1)&(Y[,3]==1 []
  10. Y[,1]==1)&(Y[,2]==1)&(Y[,3]==1 []
  11. Y[,1]==0)&(Y[,2]==1 []
  12. Y[,1]==1)&(Y[,2]==0 []
  13. Y[,1]==0)&(Y[,2]==0 []

Maudits français

Tous les malouins le savent, Jacques Cartier est parti de Saint Malo pour découvrir le Canada en 1536 (si l’on considère son second voyage, c’est à dire celui où il a vraiment pénétré le royaume de Kanata en voguant sur le Saint Laurent). Il y a d’ailleurs un musée du Québec dans les remparts. Et comme s’en vente le musée, les québécois viennent de Saint-Malo.

Or, pour ceux qui ne connaissent pas Saint-Malo, c’est à deux pas du Mont Saint Michel, et du Couesnon qui sépare la Bretagne et la Normandie. Étant né en Normandie, avant de venir vivre à Rennes,  j’étais convaincu que j’avais des racines communes avec les Québécois*. Mais j’ai été surpris en voyant les noms de famille des copines de classe de ma fille: les noms ne m’étaient pas du tout familiers… Pourtant, si nous avons des racines communes, il ne serait pas surprenant que les noms de familles se retrouvent (c’est le principe de base de la généalogie, si j’ai bien tout suivi). Aussi j’ai voulu creuser davantage….

  • Que disent les experts en généalogie ?
http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso3/aunis.gifhttp://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso3/bretagne.gifhttp://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso3/Saintonge.gifhttp://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso3/Normandie.gifhttp://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso3/anjou.gif

On peut trouver des éléments de réponse ici ou là. Parmi les 3800 Français qui ont immigré (ou émigrer, ça dépend du point de vue) entre 1608 et 1700 :

  • La Normandie a fourni 1 pionnier sur 5.
  • Le Poitou, l’Aunis et la Saintonge ont, ensemble, donné 1 pionnier sur 4.
  • Paris et l’Ile-de-France, 1 pionnier sur 7.
  • La Bretagne, un peu plus de 3 pionniers sur 100.
  • L’Anjou, 3 pionniers sur 100.
  • La Champagne, presque 3 pionniers sur 100.
  • La Picardie, un peu plus de 2 pionniers sur 100.

 

Entre 1700 et 1765, près de 5000 autres hommes, femmes et enfants originaires de France viennent s’établir au Canada, mais “très peu proviennent de la Bretagne et des régions baignées par la mer“. Ce sont d’ailleurs les ordres de grandeur que j’ai pu avoir dans l’ouvrage de Michel Lambert (qui n’est pas un livre de généalogie à proprement parler mais qui est incroyablement intéressant, même s’il ne donne pas de source – ou de détails sur le sens – pour ces chiffres),

  • Normandie, 22.6%
  • Aunis, 16.4%
  • Perche, 11.4%
  • Ile de France (région parisienne) 10.5%
  • Poitou, 7.5%
  • Maine, 5.2%
  • Saintonge 5.2%
  • Bretagne 3.5%

Moralité, même si Jacques Cartier est parti de Bretagne, rares semblent être les bretons qui ont émigrés au Québec.

  • Calculs de probabilités conditionnelles à partir des noms de famille

Il existe des sites qui donnent les “classements” des noms de familles, au Québec par exemple (ici, avec les 1000 noms les plus portés, avec les proportions respectives), ou dans les régions françaises (, où j’ai pris à chaque fois les 2000 noms les plus portés avec les proportions respectives, en changeant de région). Les données peuvent être récupérées avec le code suivant

quebec=read.table("http://freakonometrics.free.fr/nom-quebec2.txt",   
                   header=TRUE,dec=",")
bretagne=read.table("http://freakonometrics.free.fr/nom-bretagne.txt",
                    header=TRUE,dec=",",sep="\t")
poitou=read.table("http://freakonometrics.free.fr/nom-poitou.txt",
                  header=TRUE,dec=",",sep="\t")
normandie=read.table("http://freakonometrics.free.fr/nom-basse-normandie.txt",
                     header=TRUE,dec=",",sep="\t")
aquitaine=read.table("http://freakonometrics.free.fr/nom-aquitaine.txt",
                     header=TRUE,dec=",",sep="\t")
alsace=read.table("http://freakonometrics.free.fr/nom-alsace.txt",  
                  header=TRUE,dec=",",sep="\t")
loire=read.table("http://freakonometrics.free.fr/nom-loire.txt",
                 header=TRUE,dec=",",sep="\t")

J’ai retenu 6 régions françaises, et j’ai calculé la proportions de québécois dont le nom de famille était dans le top 2000 d’une région donnée, i.e.

> head(quebec)
  Rang Nomdefamille Pourcentage
1    1     Tremblay       1.076
2    2       Gagnon       0.790
3    3          Roy       0.753
4    4         Cote       0.692
5    5     Bouchard       0.530
6    6     Gauthier       0.522

> minquebec=tolower(quebec$Nomdefamille)
> rangquebec=quebec$Rang
> pctquebec=quebec$Pourcentage/sum(quebec$Pourcentage)
> head(bretagne)
  Rang Patronyme Naissances
1    1   LE GALL      18126
2    2   LE GOFF      16093
3    3   LE ROUX      15905
4    4    THOMAS      15705
5    5    MARTIN      12094
6    6    TANGUY      12045

> minbretagne=tolower(bretagne$Patronyme)
> rangbretagne=bretagne$Rang
> pctbretagne=bretagne$Naissances/sum(bretagne$Naissances)
> I=minquebec%in%minbretagne
> sum(pctquebec[I])/sum(pctquebec)
[1] 0.2579641
Région Proportion
Bretagne 23,39%
Normandie 31,07%
Loire 32,83%
Aquitaine 27,65%
Poitou 32,50%
Alsace 9,71%

Si on retrouve peu de noms alsacien au Québec, on peut être un peu “surpris” que les régions qui ressortent le plus sont la Loire et le Poitou et pas la Bretagne et la Normandie…. Bon, j’en conviens, je travaille sur les noms de familles bruts, c’est à dire que je ne tiens pas compte du fait que certains noms se sont déformés. Il s’agit de la version simple… on peut bien entendu aller plus loin, par exemple en utilisant des modèles de mélange par exemple… à suivre donc…

*en fait, mes origines sont davantage bourguignonnes, de part mes quatre grands parents, comme le savent tous ceux qui m’ont déjà payé un verre de vin… mais ayant passé toute mon enfance en Normandie, je peux me considérer un peu comme normand. Et adorant la galette saucisse, je suis définitivement breton….