Category Archives: Publications

Is there discrimination against the poor?

(With Laurence Barry, we wrote a short article on discrimination against the poor, in French)

In 2013, Martin Hirsch (former director of Emmaüs and Assistance publique – Hôpitaux de Paris) stated “it’s getting expensive to be poor”. This reality was confirmed by a recent study, in France, by the Banque Postale*, which showed that on average, a poor household has to pay 1,500 euros more each year to access the same goods and services as a better-off household, introducing a “double poverty penalty**”. Unfortunately, insurance is not left out: the use of credit scores in many countries reinforces what could be a form of discrimination against the poor. In the United States, where the practice is more common than elsewhere, a commission of inquiry recently tried to explain the link between credit score and claims frequency: is it because, as some insurers argue, people with lower scores are also less careful than others? Or is it because, having less financial means than others, they more naturally ask to be compensated for the losses incurred? And, in this second case, are we not also making them pay twice for their condition?

From excellence to wealth as a virtue

On what criteria do we admire people? For the Greeks, excellence, or arête (ἀρετή), was a major virtue. This excellence went beyond moral excellence: in the Greco-Roman world, the term evoked a form of nobility, recognizable by the beauty, strength, courage, or intelligence of the person. Now this excellence had little to do with wealth: thus Herodotus is astonished that the winners of the Olympian games were content with an olive wreath and a “glorious renown,” peri-bones (περὶ ἀρετῆς). In the Greek ethical vision, especially among the Stoics, a “good life” does not depend on material wealth – a precept pushed to its height by Diogenes who, seeing a child drinking from his hands at the fountain, throws away the bowl he had for all crockery, telling himself that it is again useless wealth.

Greek society is nevertheless a deeply hierarchical society, even if it is organized around values other than material wealth. We can then ask ourselves at what point in Western history wealth became the measure of all things. One thinks then of Max Weber’s theory: the ethics of Protestantism pushes for work and earthly success as a revelation of a divine election to come: the rich of this world would be the chosen of the next. In the same way Adam Smith, taking a critical look at the birth of capitalism in the society of his time, titles a chapter of The Theory of Moral Sentiments (1759) “Of the corruption of our moral feelings occasioned by that disposition to admire the rich and great, and to despise or neglect the poor and lowly.”

Today, the cult of wealth seems to have never been so strong and material success is almost elevated to the rank of virtue. On the other hand, poverty becomes a stigma that is hard to get rid of; but history shows us that this is not natural.

From “good” to “bad” poor

Indeed, the poor have not always been “bad”. As Fulconis & Kikuchi (2017) remind us, the Church has largely contributed to disseminating the image of the “good poor”, as it appears in the Gospels: “happy are you poor, the kingdom of God is yours”; or “God could have made all men rich, but he wanted there to be poor people in this world, so that the rich would have an opportunity to redeem their sins”. Beyond this, the poor is seen as an image of Christ, Jesus having said “whatever you do to the least of these, you will do to me”. Helping the poor, doing a work of mercy, is a means of salvation.

For Saint Thomas Aquinas, charity is thus essential to correct social inequalities by redistributing wealth through almsgiving***. In the Middle Ages, merchants were seen as useful, even virtuous, since they allowed wealth to circulate within the community. Priests played the role of social assistants, helping the sick, the elderly and the disabled. The hospices and xenodochia of the Middle Ages (ξενοδοχεῖον, that “place for strangers,” ξένος) are the symbol of this care of the poor. And quite often, poverty is not limited to material capital, but also social and cultural, to use a more contemporary terminology.

Towards the end of the Middle Ages, the figure of the “bad poor”, the parasitic and dangerous vagabond, appeared. In line with Weber, Todeschini (2021) insists on the increasing value attached to work and social “usefulness”. Brant (1494), the first, begins to denounce these welfare recipients, “some become beggars at an age when, young and strong, and in full health, one could work: why bother”. For Fulconis & Kikichi (2017), this mistrust is reinforced with the great pandemic of the Black Death. Colombi (2020) returns to this turning point, at the end of the Middle Ages, when in the cities, the bourgeois closed their districts with chains, to avoid that “poor and foreigners” settle there. The hygienic theories of the end of the 19th century added the final touch: if fevers and diseases were caused by insalubrity and poor living conditions, then by keeping the poor out, they were protected from disease.

Poor… by choice?

In the words of Mollat (2006) “the poor are those who, permanently or temporarily, find themselves in a situation of weakness, dependence, humiliation, characterized by the deprivation of means, variable according to the times and the societies, of power and social consideration”. Recently, Cortina (2022) proposed the term “aporophobia”, or “pauvrophobia”, to describe a whole set of prejudices that exist towards the poor. The unemployed are said to be welfare recipients and lazy, says Lamy; it is also the famous “where there is a will there is a way”, (which can be found in contemporary expressions such as “those who don’t want to do anything, those who don’t want to work” or “I’ll cross the street and find you a job”). And as is often the case, these prejudices, which stigmatize a group, “the poor”, lead to fear or hatred, generating an important cleavage, and finally a form of discrimination. Cortina’s (2022) “pauvrophobia” is a discrimination against social precariousness, which would be almost more important than “usual” forms of discrimination, such as racism or xenophobia. Cortina ironically notes that rich foreigners are often not rejected.

But these prejudices also turn into accusations. Szalavitz (2017) thus abruptly asks the question, “Why do we think poor people are poor because of their own bad choices?”. The “actor-observer” bias provides one element of an answer: we often think that it is circumstances, which constrain our own choices, but that it is the behavior of others that changes theirs. In other words, others are poor because they made bad choices, but if I am poor, it is because of an unfair system. This bias is also valid for the rich: winners often tend to believe that they got where they are by their own hard work, and that they therefore deserve what they have.

Social science studies show, however, that the poor are rarely poor by choice, and increasing inequality and geographic segregation do not help. The lack of empathy then leads to more polarization, more rejection and, in a vicious circle, even less empathy.

Links between wealth and risk(s)

To discriminate is to distinguish (exclude or prefer) a person because of his/her “personal characteristics”. Can we then speak of discrimination against the poor? Is poverty (like gender or skin color) a personal characteristic? In Quebec, “social condition” (which explicitly includes poverty) is one of the protected variables and therefore prohibited discrimination. This is not the case in France. As Barry & Charpentier (2021) remind us, when actuaries calculate a premium, discrimination directly linked to risk, and provided that the variable is not protected, is generally seen as legitimate. However, it is well known that wealth or social status has a lot to do with risk, whatever it may be. At the global level, Denis Hatzfeld reminds us that “earthquakes are much more deadly in poor countries than in developed countries, which have gradually learned to protect themselves from them. Similarly, Le Hir (2010) states that “A schoolboy is 400 times more likely to die in an earthquake in Kathmandu than in Tokyo”.

This is true for most risks. In France, we find in the deaths due to road accidents 3% of executives and 15% of workers, while they represent nearly 20% of the working population each, according to ONISR (2022). Blanpain (2018) points out that the gap in life expectancy at birth is 13 years between the most affluent and the most modest men. Recently, Allain (2022) noted that the most modest French people, at comparable age and sex, had almost three times more diabetes, twice as much liver or pancreatic disease, 1.6 times more chronic respiratory disease, etc. than the average. Cambois, Laborde and Robine (2008) similarly noted that the number of years of disability for blue-collar workers is also much higher, over a shorter life span on average.

The use of credit scores in insurance

In North America, companies such as Experian, Equifax and TransUnion keep records of the borrowing and repayment activities of all individuals with bank accounts. FICO (Fair Isaac Corporation) offers a formula to convert these records into a score, the credit score. This score is a function of debt and available credit, income and its variations, and history of incidents, bankruptcies or simple delinquencies. It is often seen as an assessment of a person’s creditworthiness, or the likelihood that he or she will repay debts. It is by nature closely related to income (Crowe 2022), making the credit score a robust proxy for wealth. Fourcade and Healy (2013) show that, as a good credit score has become a necessary condition for obtaining credit and maintaining purchasing power, this system has come to create an impenetrable wall between advantaged and disadvantaged classes. In a sense, a bad credit score becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy: people with a bad score (and therefore considered high risk by banks) become dependent on short-term alternatives. This increases the costs of future financing, thus the probability of default (François 2021) but also the probability of not finding a job (this score can be requested by employers****). “Using credit scores to punish the poor exacerbates existing socioeconomic inequalities,” Wang (2018) thus aptly asserts.

As an example, Table 1 compares a few parameters based on people’s credit scores, including the rate obtained for a $150,000 loan over a 30-year horizon, and the average insurance premium charged for car insurance (for a 30-year-old driver, driving 20,000km per year, in the city).

Table 1: Actual price of a $150,000 loan and the amount of a car insurance premium (for comparable coverage and risk profile), based on credit score (ranging from 300 to 850). Source: InCharge Debt Solutions.

Kiviat (2019) has extensively studied the use of credit scores in the pricing of auto insurance in the United States. The US regulator has indeed looked at the proven link between bad credit score and auto risk. What explanation can be given for this correlation? Wouldn’t the score be an indicator of poverty and not a proxy for the driver’s prudence as insurers claim? For if social condition is not a protected variable as it is in Canada, it is still largely associated with skin color, which is a prohibited variable. Discriminating on the basis of credit score could therefore amount to prohibited racial discrimination. By examining the debates around these issues, Kiviat highlights the ethical complexity of using facially neutral variables. And if, as noted above, poor living conditions increase risk in general, it is worth asking whether insurance is not helping to apply the double whammy that Martin Hirsch spoke of to the poor.

References

Allain, S. (2022). Les maladies chroniques touchent plus souvent les personnes modestes et réduisent davantage leur espérance de vie. DREES, 1243
Blanpain, N. (2018). L’espérance de vie par niveau de vie : chez les hommes, 13 ans d’écart entre les plus aisés et les plus modestes. Insee, Insee Première, 1687.
Bourdelais, P. (2001) Les hygiénistes: enjeux, modèles et pratiques. Éditions Belin.
Brant, S. (1494). La Nef des fous (Das Narrenschiff).
Cambois, E., Laborde, C & Robine, J.M. (2008). La “double peine” des ouvriers : plus d’années d’incapacité au sein d’une vie plus courte. Population & Sociétés, n° 441.
Caplovitz, D. (1963). Poor pay more; consumer practices of low-income families. Free Press.
Colombi, D., (2020). Où va l’argent des pauvres. Payot.
Cortina, A. (2022). Aporophobia: Why We Reject the Poor Instead of Helping Them. Princeton University Press.
Crowe, A. (2022). The Relationship Between Income and Credit Score. Credit Sesame Personal Finance and Credit Survey,
Fourcade, M. & Healy, K. (2013). Classification situations: Life-chances in the neoliberal era, Accounting, Organizations and Society, 38 (8): 559–572
François, P. (2021). Catégorisation, individualisation. Retour sur les scores de crédit. Chaire PARI, WP #24.
Fulconis, M. & Kikuchi, C. (2017) Vu du Moyen Âge : du « bon pauvre » au « mauvais pauvre ». The Conversation.
Grossetête, M. (2012) Accidents de la route et inégalités sociales. Les morts, les médias et l’État, Éditions du Croquant.
Kiviat, B. (2019). The moral limits of predictive practices: The case of credit-based insurance scores. American Sociological Review, 84(6), 1134-1158.
Lamy, T. (2022) Assistés, paresseux… pour 50% des Français, les chômeurs sont responsables de leur situation. Capital, décembre 2022
Lauer,J. (2017) Creditworthy: A History of Consumer Surveillance and Financial Identity in America, Columbia University Press.
Le Hir, P. (2010). Catastrophes et pauvreté, la double peine. Le Monde, 22 janvier,
Merton, R. (1968). The Matthew effect in science, Science, vol. CLIX, n° 3810
Mollat, M. (2006). Les pauvres au moyen age (Vol. 11). Éditions Complexe.
ONISR (2022). La sécurité routière en France, bilan de l’accidentalité de l’année 2021. https://bit.ly/3QmuR8H
Pratchett, (1993) Men at Arms, 15ème tome du cycle Discworld, Victor Gollancz Ed.
Smith, A. (1759). La Théorie des sentiments moraux. Presses Universitaires de France, Quadrige.
Szalavitz, M. (2017). Why do we think poor people are poor because of their own bad choices. The Guardian, 5 Juillet
Todeschini, G. (2021) Moyen Âge. La pauvreté a-t-elle un sens ? L’Histoire, février 2021.
Wang, J. (2018), Carceral Capitalism, MIT Press.
Weber, M. (1990 [1904]). L’éthique protestante et l’esprit du capitalisme, Pocket.

* Study entitled “Study of the double poverty penalty in France“, published at the end of 2022 by Action Tank Entreprise & Pauvreté, Boston Consulting Group and the Banque Postale

** This phenomenon, widely studied in the 1960s, see Caplovitz (1963), is known in economics as the “boot theory” (popularized by Pratchett’s novel (1993)), “take boots, for example. A really good pair of leather boots costs fifty dollars. But an affordable pair of boots, which were sort of OK for a season or two and then leaked like hell when the cardboard gave out, cost about ten dollars (…). But the thing was that good boots lasted for years and years.”

*** The notion of redistribution can be contrasted with the “Matthew effect” as defined by Merton (1950). Inspired by a passage from the Gospel according to St. Matthew (which he reverses), he states that “to him who has shall be given, and he shall have plenty; but to him who has not, even that which he has shall be taken away.”

**** This rating practice is actually not new and dates back to the late 19th century: Josh Lauer (2017) shows that as early as 1870, so well before big data or even credit cards, US banks employed assessors to make financial strength reports on people. For Lauer, it is a gigantic surveillance system that was set up at the beginning of the 20th century, leading to the algorithmic credit scores as we know them today (see also François (2021)).

Y-a-t-il une discrimination contre les pauvres ?

(Avec Laurence Barry, on a écrit un court article sur la discrimination contre les pauvres)

En 2013, Martin Hirsch affirmait “cela devient cher d’être pauvre”. Cette réalité a été confirmée par une récente étude de la Banque Postale*, qui montrait qu’en moyenne, un ménage pauvre doit payer 1500 euros en plus chaque année pour accéder aux mêmes biens et services qu’un ménage plus aisé, introduisant une “double pénalité** de pauvreté”. Hélas, l’assurance n’est pas en reste : l’utilisation de score de crédit dans de nombreux pays vient en effet renforcer ce qui pourrait s’apparenter à une forme de discrimination des pauvres. Aux États-Unis, où la pratique est plus courante qu’ailleurs, une commission d’enquête a ainsi tenté récemment d’expliquer le lien entre score de crédit et fréquence de sinistres : est-ce parce que, comme l’avancent certains assureurs, les personnes ayant un score plus faible sont aussi moins prudents que les autres ? Ou serait-ce parce que, ayant moins de moyens financiers que d’autres ils demandent plus naturellement à être indemnisés pour les sinistres encourus ? Et, dans ce deuxième cas de figure, n’est-on pas là aussi en train de leur faire payer deux fois leur condition ?

De l’excellence à la richesse comme vertu

Sur quels critères admirent-on les gens ? Pour les Grecs, l’excellence, ou arêté (ἀρετή), était une vertu majeure. Cette excellence allait au-delà de l’excellence morale: dans le monde gréco-romain, le terme évoquait une forme de noblesse, reconnaissable à la beauté, la force, le courage, ou l’intelligence de la personne. Or cette excellence n’avait pas grand-chose à voir avec la richesse : ainsi Hérodote s’étonne-t-il que les vainqueurs des jeux de l’Olympe se contentent d’une couronne d’olivier et d’un « glorieux renom », péri arêtes (περὶ ἀρετῆς). Dans la vision éthique grecque, notamment chez les stoïciens, une « vie bonne » ne dépend pas de la richesse matérielle – précepte poussé à son comble par Diogène qui, voyant un enfant boire dans ses mains à la fontaine, jette l’écuelle qu’il avait pour toute vaisselle, se disant que c’est là-encore une richesse inutile.

La société grecque n’en demeure pas moins une société profondément hiérarchique, même si elle est organisée autour de valeurs autres que la richesse matérielle. On peut alors se demander à quel moment de l’histoire occidentale la richesse est devenue la mesure de toute chose. On pense alors à la théorie de Max Weber : l’éthique du protestantisme pousse au travail et à la réussite terrestre comme révélation d’une élection divine à venir : les riches de ce monde seraient les élus du prochain. De la même manière Adam Smith, portant un regard critique sur la naissance du capitalisme dans la société de son temps, intitule un chapitre de La théorie des sentiments moraux (1759) “De la corruption de nos sentiments moraux occasionnée par cette disposition à admirer les riches et les grands, et à mépriser ou négliger les personnes pauvres et d’humble condition.”

Aujourd’hui, le culte de la richesse semble n’avoir jamais été aussi fort et la réussite matérielle est presque élevée au rang de vertu. En contrepartie, la pauvreté devient un stigmate dont il est difficile de se défaire ; mais l’histoire nous montre que ceci n’a rien de naturel.

Du “bon” au “mauvais” pauvre

En effet, le pauvre n’a pas toujours été “mauvais”. Comme le rappellent Fulconis & Kikichi (2017), l’Église a largement contribué à diffuser l’image du “bon pauvre”, tel qu’elle apparait dans les Evangiles: “heureux vous les pauvres, le royaume de Dieu est à vous” ; ou encore “Dieu aurait pu faire tous les hommes riches, mais il voulut qu’il y ait des pauvres en ce monde, afin que les riches aient une occasion de racheter leurs péchés”. Au-delà de ce faire-valoir, le pauvre est vu comme une image du Christ, Jésus ayant dit “ce que vous ferez au plus petit d’entre les miens, c’est à moi que vous le ferez”. Aider le pauvre, faire œuvre de miséricorde, c’est un moyen de faire son salut.

Pour Saint Thomas d’Aquin, la charité est ainsi essentielle pour corriger les inégalités sociales en redistribuant les richesses par l’aumône***. Au Moyen-Âge, le marchand est vu comme utile, voire vertueux, puisqu’il permet aux richesses de circuler au sein de la communauté. Les prêtres jouent alors le rôle d’assistants sociaux, en aidant les malades, les vieillards, les invalides. Les hospices et les xenodochia du Moyen-Âge (ξενοδοχεῖον, ce “lieu pour étrangers”, ξένος) sont le symbole de cette prise en charge des pauvres. Et bien souvent, la pauvreté ne se limite pas au capital matériel, mais aussi social et culturel, pour reprendre une terminologie plus contemporaine.

Vers la fin du Moyen-Age, la figure du « mauvais pauvre », du vagabond parasite et dangereux, fait son apparition. Dans la lignée de Weber, Todeschini (2021) insiste sur la valeur croissante attachée au travail, et à l’ « utilité » sociale. Brant (1494), le premier, commence à dénoncer ces assistés, “certains se font mendiants à l’âge où, jeune et fort, et en pleine santé on pourrait travailler : pourquoi se fatiguer”. Pour Fulconis & Kikichi (2017), cette défiance se renforce avec la grande pandémie de Peste Noire. Colombi (2020) revient sur ce tournant, à la fin du Moyen-Âge, où dans les villes, les bourgeois ferment leurs quartiers par des chaînes, pour éviter que des “pauvres et étrangers” s’y installent. Les théories hygiénistes de la fin XIXème siècle viendront ajouter la touche finale : si les fièvres et les maladies ont pour cause l’insalubrité et les mauvaises conditions de vie, en écartant les pauvres, on se protège des maladies.

Pauvres… par choix ?

Pour reprendre les termes de Mollat (2006) “le pauvre est celui qui, de façon permanente ou temporaire, se retrouve dans une situation de faiblesse, de dépendance, d’humiliation, caractérisée par la privation de moyens, variables selon les époques et les sociétés, de puissance et de considération sociale”. Récemment, Cortina (2022) proposait le terme “aporophobie”, ou “pauvrophobie”, pour décrire tout un ensemble de préjugés qui existent envers les pauvres. Les chômeurs seraient des assistés et des paresseux, nous dit Lamy ; c’est aussi le fameux “quand on veut on peut”, (que l’on retrouve dans des expressions contemporaines telles que “ceux qui ne veulent rien faire, ceux qui ne veulent pas travailler” ou encore “je traverse la rue et je vous trouve un travail”). Et comme souvent, ces préjugés, qui stigmatisent un groupe, “les pauvres”, conduisent à la peur ou la haine, engendrant un clivage important, et finalement une forme de discrimination. La “pauvrophobie” de Cortina (2022) est une discrimination envers la précarité sociale, qui serait presque plus importante que les formes « usuelles » de discrimination, comme le racisme ou la xénophobie. Cortina note ironiquement que souvent, les étrangers riches ne sont pas rejetés.

Mais ces préjugés tournent aussi en accusation. Szalavitz (2017) pose ainsi abruptement la question : “Pourquoi pensons-nous que les pauvres sont pauvres à cause de leurs propres mauvais choix ?”. Le biais “acteur-observateur” fournit un élément de réponse : nous pensons souvent que ce sont les circonstances, qui contraignent nos propres choix, mais que c’est le comportement des autres qui modifie les leurs. Autrement dit, les autres sont pauvres parce qu’elles ont fait de mauvais choix, mais si je suis pauvre, c’est à cause d’un système injuste. Ce biais est aussi valide pour les riches : les gagnants ont ainsi souvent tendance à croire qu’ils sont arrivés là où ils sont par leur travail seul, et qu’ils méritent donc ce qu’ils ont.

Les études en sciences sociales montrent cependant que les pauvres le sont rarement par choix, et l’augmentation des inégalités et de la ségrégation géographique n’arrange rien. Le manque d’empathie favorise alors une plus grande polarisation, davantage de rejet et, bouclant le cercle vicieux, encore moins d’empathie.

Liens entre richesse et risque(s)

Discriminer, c’est distinguer (exclure ou préférer) une personne en raison de ses “caractéristiques personnelles”. Peut-on alors parler de discrimination contre les pauvres ? La pauvreté (au même titre que le sexe, ou la couleur de peau) est-elle une caractéristique personnelle ? Au Québec, la “condition sociale” (incluant explicitement la pauvreté) fait partie des variables sensibles et donc des discriminations interdites. Ce n’est pas le cas en France. Comme le rappelaient Barry & Charpentier (2021), lorsque les actuaires calculent une prime, les discriminations liées directement au risque, et pour autant que la variable ne soit pas protégée, sont vues en général comme légitimes. Or il est bien connu que la richesse, ou le statut social a beaucoup de lien avec le risque, quel qu’il soit. Au niveau mondial, Denis Hatzfeld rappelle que “les séismes sont beaucoup plus meurtriers dans les pays pauvres que dans les pays développés qui ont appris progressivement à s’en protéger ». De la même manière, Le Hir (2010) affirme que « Un écolier a 400 fois plus de probabilités de mourir dans un tremblement de terre à Katmandou qu’à Tokyo ».

Ce constat se retrouve sur la majorité des risques. En France, on trouve dans les décès dus aux accidents de la route 3% de cadres supérieurs et 15% d’ouvriers, alors qu’ils représentent près de 20% de la population active chacun, selon ONISR (2022). Blanpain (2018) rappelle que l’écart d’espérance de vie à la naissance est de 13 ans entre les hommes les plus aisés et les plus modestes. Récemment, Allain (2022) relevait que les Français les plus modestes, à âge et sexe comparable, avaient presque trois fois plus de diabète, deux fois plus de maladies du foie ou du pancréas, 1,6 fois plus de maladies respiratoires chroniques, etc. que la moyenne. Cambois, Laborde et Robine (2008) notaient de même que le nombre d’années d’incapacité pour les ouvriers est également beaucoup plus élevé, sur une vie plus courte en moyenne.

De l’usage des scores de crédit en assurance

En Amérique du Nord, des compagnies comme Experian, Equifax ou TransUnion tiennent des registres des activités d’emprunt et de remboursement de l’ensemble des personnes titulaires d’un compte bancaire. La société FICO (Fair Isaac Corporation) propose une formule permettant de convertir ces registres en une note, le score de crédit. Ce score est fonction de la dette et du crédit disponible, du revenu et de ses variations, et de l’historique d’incidents, de faillites ou de simples retards. Il est souvent perçu comme une évaluation de la solvabilité d’une personne, ou la probabilité qu’elle rembourse ses dettes. Il est par nature étroitement lié avec le revenu (Crowe 2022), faisant du score de crédit un proxy robuste de la richesse. Fourcade et Healy (2013) montrent que, comme un bon score de crédit est devenu une condition nécessaire pour obtenir un crédit et maintenir son pouvoir d’achat, ce système en est venu à créer un mur infranchissable entre classes favorisées et défavorisées. En un sens, un mauvais score de crédit devient une prophétie auto-réalisatrice : en effet, les personnes ayant un mauvais score (donc considérées comme à haut risque par les banques) deviennent dépendantes d’alternatives à court terme. Ceci augmente les coûts des financements futurs, donc la probabilité de défaut (François 2021) mais aussi celle de ne pas trouver d’emploi (ce score pouvant être demandé par les employeurs****). “L’usage des scores de crédit pour punir les pauvres exacerbe les inégalités socio-économiques existantes », affirme ainsi Wang (2018) avec justesse.

Pour l’exemple, le Tableau 1 compare quelques paramètres en fonction du score de crédit des personnes, notamment le taux obtenu pour un emprunt de 150,000$ sur un horizon de 30 ans, et la prime d’assurance moyenne demandée pour une assurance automobile (pour un conducteur de 30 ans, conduisant 20,000km par an, en ville).

Tableau 1: Prix réel d’un emprunt de 150,000$ et montant d’une prime d’assurance automobile, en fonction du score de crédit (allant de 300 à 850). Source: InCharge Debt Solutions.

Kiviat (2019) a longuement étudié l’usage des scores de crédit dans la tarification de l’assurance automobile aux Etats-Unis. Le régulateur américain s’est en effet penché sur le lien avéré entre mauvais score de crédit et risque automobile. Quelle explication peut-on donner à cette corrélation ? Est-ce que le score ne serait pas un indicateur de pauvreté et non un proxy de la prudence du conducteur comme l’avancent les assureurs ? Car si la condition sociale n’est pas comme au Canada une variable protégée, elle est encore largement associée à la couleur de peau, qui est, elle, une variable interdite. Discriminer en fonction du score de crédit pourrait alors bien se ramener à une discrimination raciale prohibée. L’examen des débats autour de ces questions permet à Kiviat de mettre en évidence la complexité éthique de l’usage de variables facialement neutres. Et si, comme indiqué plus haut, les mauvaises conditions de vie augmentent les risques de façon générale il serait bon de se demander si l’assurance ne contribue pas à appliquer aux pauvres cette double-peine dont parlait Martin Hirsch.

Références

Allain, S. (2022). Les maladies chroniques touchent plus souvent les personnes modestes et réduisent davantage leur espérance de vie. DREES, 1243
Blanpain, N. (2018). L’espérance de vie par niveau de vie : chez les hommes, 13 ans d’écart entre les plus aisés et les plus modestes. Insee, Insee Première, 1687.
Bourdelais, P. (2001) Les hygiénistes: enjeux, modèles et pratiques. Éditions Belin.
Brant, S. (1494). La Nef des fous (Das Narrenschiff).
Cambois, E., Laborde, C & Robine, J.M. (2008). La “double peine” des ouvriers : plus d’années d’incapacité au sein d’une vie plus courte. Population & Sociétés, n° 441.
Caplovitz, D. (1963). Poor pay more; consumer practices of low-income families. Free Press.
Colombi, D., (2020). Où va l’argent des pauvres. Payot.
Cortina, A. (2022). Aporophobia: Why We Reject the Poor Instead of Helping Them. Princeton University Press.
Crowe, A. (2022). The Relationship Between Income and Credit Score. Credit Sesame Personal Finance and Credit Survey,
Fourcade, M. & Healy, K. (2013). Classification situations: Life-chances in the neoliberal era, Accounting, Organizations and Society, 38 (8): 559–572
François, P. (2021). Catégorisation, individualisation. Retour sur les scores de crédit. Chaire PARI, WP #24.
Fulconis, M. & Kikichi, C. (2017) Vu du Moyen Âge : du « bon pauvre » au « mauvais pauvre ». The Conversation.
Grossetête, M. (2012) Accidents de la route et inégalités sociales. Les morts, les médias et l’État, Éditions du Croquant.
Kiviat, B. (2019). The moral limits of predictive practices: The case of credit-based insurance scores. American Sociological Review, 84(6), 1134-1158.
Lamy, T. (2022) Assistés, paresseux… pour 50% des Français, les chômeurs sont responsables de leur situation. Capital, décembre 2022
Lauer,J. (2017) Creditworthy: A History of Consumer Surveillance and Financial Identity in America, Columbia University Press.
Le Hir, P. (2010). Catastrophes et pauvreté, la double peine. Le Monde, 22 janvier,
Merton, R. (1968). The Matthew effect in science, Science, vol. CLIX, n° 3810
Mollat, M. (2006). Les pauvres au moyen age (Vol. 11). Éditions Complexe.
ONISR (2022). La sécurité routière en France, bilan de l’accidentalité de l’année 2021. https://bit.ly/3QmuR8H
Pratchett, (1993) Men at Arms, 15ème tome du cycle Discworld, Victor Gollancz Ed.
Smith, A. (1759). La Théorie des sentiments moraux. Presses Universitaires de France, Quadrige.
Szalavitz, M. (2017). Why do we think poor people are poor because of their own bad choices. The Guardian, 5 Juillet
Todeschini, G. (2021) Moyen Âge. La pauvreté a-t-elle un sens ? L’Histoire, février 2021.
Wang, J. (2018), Carceral Capitalism, MIT Press.
Weber, M. (1990 [1904]). L’éthique protestante et l’esprit du capitalisme, Pocket.

* Étude intitulée “Etude de la double pénalité de pauvreté en France”, publiée fin 2022 par Action Tank Entreprise & Pauvreté, Boston Consulting Group et la Banque Postale

** Ce phénomène, largement étudié dans les années 60, voir Caplovitz (1963), est connu en économie sous le nom de la “théorie des bottes” (popularisée par le roman de Pratchett (1993)), “take boots, for example. A really good pair of leather boots cost fifty dollars. But an affordable pair of boots, which were sort of OK for a season or two and then leaked like hell when the cardboard gave out, cost about ten dollars (…). But the thing was that good boots lasted for years and years.”

*** A la notion de redistribution, on peut opposer « l’effet Matthieu » tel que défini par Merton (1950). Inspiré par un passage de l’Évangile selon saint Matthieu (qu’il renverse), il affirme que « on donnera à celui qui a, et il sera dans l’abondance, mais à celui qui n’a pas, on ôtera même ce qu’il a ».

**** Cette pratique de notation n’est en fait pas nouvelle et date de la fin du XIXe siècle : Josh Lauer (2017) montre en effet que dès 1870, donc bien avant le big data ou même les cartes de crédit, les banques états-uniennes employaient des assesseurs pour établir des rapports de solidité financière sur les personnes. Pour Lauer, c’est un gigantesque système de surveillance qui se met en place dès le début du XXe siècle, pour aboutir aux scores de crédit algorithmiques tels qu’on les connait aujourd’hui (voir aussi François (2021)).

A Fair Pricing Model via Adversarial Learning

We recently uploaded a revised version of our joint paper A Fair Pricing Model via Adversarial Learning, on ArXiv.

At the core of insurance business lies classification between risky and non-risky insureds, actuarial fairness meaning that risky insureds should contribute more and pay a higher premium than non-risky or less-risky ones. Actuaries, therefore, use econometric or machine learning techniques to classify, but the distinction between a fair actuarial classification and `discrimination’ is subtle. For this reason, there is a growing interest about fairness and discrimination in the actuarial community Lindholm et al. (2022). Presumably, non-sensitive characteristics can serve as substitutes or proxies for protected attributes. For example, the color and model of a car, combined with the driver’s occupation, may lead to an undesirable gender bias in the prediction of car insurance prices. Fairness in insurance pricing is a relatively new and much-requested topic, especially in light of new laws and regulations and past issues encountered in practice (Embrechts and Wüthrich, 2022; Frees and Huang, 2021; Gao and Wüthrich, 2018). Consequently, companies/regulators are looking for new methodologies to ensure a sufficient level of fairness while maintaining an adequate accuracy of predictive models. This paper discusses the importance of adapting the traditional fairness algorithms to specific real-life applications and, in particular, to insurance pricing. We claim that mitigating undesired biases with a generic fair algorithm can be counterproductive insurance. We will show that traditional Fair-ML as adversarial methods are not currently adequate for insurance pricing. Therefore, for these purposes, we have developed a more suitable and effective framework to satisfy a fairness objective while maintaining a sufficient level of predictor accuracy. Inspired by the recent approaches, Blier et al. (2021) and Wuthrich et al. (2021), that have shown the value of autoencoders in pricing, we will show that (2) it can be generalized to multiple pricing factors (geographic, car type), (3) it is more adapted for a fairness context (since it allows to debias the set of pricing components): We extend this main idea to a general framework in which a single whole pricing model is trained by generating the geographic and car pricing components needed to predict the pure premium while mitigating the unwanted bias according to the desired metric. 

There are more examples in this revised version, including the case of a non-binary target, and a non-binary senssitive attribute, such as a spatial one

Multiarmed Bandits Problem Under the Mean-Variance Setting

With Mario Ghossoub, Alexander Schied, and our PhD student Hongda Hu, we recently uploaded a paper entitled Multiarmed Bandits Problem Under the Mean-Variance Setting on ArXiv,

The classical multi-armed bandit (MAB) problem involves a learner and a collection of K independent arms, each with its own ex ante unknown independent reward distribution. At each one of a finite number of rounds, the learner selects one arm and receives new information. The learner often faces an exploration-exploitation dilemma: exploiting the current information by playing the arm with the highest estimated reward versus exploring all arms to gather more reward information. The design objective aims to maximize the expected cumulative reward over all rounds. However, such an objective does not account for a risk-reward tradeoff, which is often a fundamental precept in many areas of applications, most notably in finance and economics. In this paper, we build upon Sani et al. (2012) and extend the classical MAB problem to a mean-variance setting. Specifically, we relax the assumptions of independent arms and bounded rewards made in Sani et al. (2012) by considering sub-Gaussian arms. We introduce the Risk Aware Lower Confidence Bound (RALCB) algorithm to solve the problem, and study some of its properties. Finally, we perform a number of numerical simulations to demonstrate that, in both independent and dependent scenarios, our suggested approach performs better than the algorithm suggested by Sani et al. (2012).

Insurance analytics: prediction, explainability and fairness (call for papers)

Call for papers: Insurance analytics: prediction, explainability and fairness –  special issue of the Annals of Actuarial Science. Submissions open 1 December 2022 and close 30 September 2023. With Kjersti Aas (Norwegian Computing Center & Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU)), Ronald Richman (Old Mutual Insure & University of the Witwatersrand) and myself, serving as guest editors,

Scope of the special issue:
·        Methodological innovations in predictive analytics applied in insurance
·        Case studies of applications of machine learning and artificial intelligence within insurance
·        Methods for interpreting predictive models and designing inherently explainable models
·        Addressing discrimination and fairness considerations in insurance pricing and related applications
·        Algorithmic auditing and validation of predictive models in insurance
·        Software that enables the operationalisation of methods relating to the scope of the special issue
·        New developments with insurance applications in areas closely related to actuarial science

This special issue aims to capture leading academic thinking and industry applications in advanced insurance analytics. Submissions should demonstrate advances in at least one of the domains of predictive accuracy, explainable modelling and fairness. More…

Climate risk, some slow long-term trend?

In most of the scenarios that talk about climate change, we are told about projections for 2050 or even 2100, time scales that are so far away that we have the illusion that the major risks will only be for “future generations“. And these scenarios evoke the possibility of a rise of 1, 2 or 4°C in several decades, a figure that should seem derisory when we are used to seeing temperatures vary by 10 or 20°C within the same day, by 15, 20 or even 30°C between winter and summer. In this context, how can we finally think seriously about climate risk?  Continue reading Climate risk, some slow long-term trend?

Le risque climatique, une tendance lente de long terme ?

Il s’agit ici de la version préliminaire de l’article depuis paru dans Risques, à l’automne 2022.

Dans la plupart des scénarios qui évoquent les changements climatiques, on nous parle de projections avec pour horizon 2050, voire 2100, des échelles de temps tellement lointaines qu’on a l’illusion que les risques majeurs seront seulement pour les « générations futures ». Et ces scénarios évoquent des possibilités de hausse de 1,2 ou 4°C d’ici plusieurs décennies, chiffre qui devrait sembler dérisoires quand on est habitué à voir des températures varier de 10 ou 20°C au sein d’une même journée, de 15, 20 voire 30°C entre l’hiver et l’été. Dans ce contexte, comment penser enfin sérieusement le risque climatique ?  Continue reading Le risque climatique, une tendance lente de long terme ?

Le site du Manuel d’Assurance

Le Manuel d’Assurance, annoncé pour la rentrée, est officiellement publié 🍾 Le manuel a été co-écrit avec Gilles Bénéplanc et Patrick Thourot, et le site associé est en ligne, manueldassurance.github.io

On a mise en ligne les figures du livres (les images qui apparaissent sont en faible résolution, et en cliquant, la figure en (très haute) résolution est disponible – avec un fond transparent, pour s’adapter facilement sur des slides)

et on va rajouter du matériel au fur et à mesure

Collaborative Insurance Sustainability and Network Structure

A second version of Collaborative Insurance Sustainability and Network Structure is now available on ArXiv,

The peer-to-peer (P2P) economy has been growing with the advent of the Internet, with well known brands such as Uber or Airbnb being examples thereof. In the insurance sector the approach is still in its infancy, but some companies have started to explore P2P-based collaborative insurance products (eg. Lemonade in the U.S. or Inspeer in France). The actuarial literature only recently started to consider those risk sharing mechanisms, as in Denuit and Robert (2021) or Feng et al. (2021). In this paper, describe and analyse such a P2P product, with some reciprocal risk sharing contracts. Here, we consider the case where policyholders still have an insurance contract, but the first self-insurance layer, below the deductible, can be shared with friends. We study the impact of the shape of the network (through the distribution of degrees) on the risk reduction. We consider also some optimal setting of the reciprocal commitments, and discuss the introduction of contracts with friends of friends to mitigate some possible drawbacks of having people without enough connections to exchange risks.

Les biais, les discriminations et l’équité en assurance

Sur Variances, un court article pour présenter le rapport remis au début de l’été à l’Institut Louis Bachelier, Assurance : Discrimination, biais et équité.

Les données massives et les performances obtenues par les algorithmes d’apprentissage automatique ont chamboulé l’assurance et l’actuariat. Les questions soulevées par ces nouveaux outils dans d’autres contextes (que ce soit la justice prédictive (ou justice “actuarielle” comme l’appelle Harcourt (2008)) ou les débats sur les fake news, en passant par les véhicules autonomes et la médecine prédictive) poussent les actuaires au doute, et à la méfiance. Kranzberg (1986) affirmait que “technology is neither good nor bad; nor is it neutral”, mettant en avant que, même sans mauvaises intentions, les algorithmes d’apprentissage pouvaient être injustes. Et corriger ces possibles injustices n’est pas simple. Pour Nielsen (2020), “technology does not necessarily self-regulate, via either market or social pressures” (la main invisible des marchés ou de la pression sociale ne suffira peut être pas). C’est dans ce contexte que nous allons revenir ici sur les problématiques de biais, de discrimination et d’équité, des modèles prédictifs utilisés en assurance. Ces changements, tant sur les données que sur les modèles, que l’on observe depuis une petite dizaine d’années, avaient déjà questionné l’existence même de l’assurance (à suivre).

What is the future of predictive probabilities in insurance?

This post was written with Laurence Barry and Ewen Gallic, in French, in November 2019 (see hal-02350006)

Insurance policies are classic examples of random contracts. This forces insurers to regularly quantify this uncertainty, to calculate probabilities in order to propose “fair” premiums for the commitments they are going to make. Isn’t it time to question this practice, at a time when artificial intelligence is exploding, offering predictive algorithms of a precision never seen before? At a time when big data / big brother could mean the disappearance of uncertainty itself?
Continue reading What is the future of predictive probabilities in insurance?

On consequences of Goodhart’s law

This post was initially written in French, in the Winter 2021.

As Marilyn Strathern stated, Goodhart’s Law says that “when a measure becomes a goal, it ceases to be a good measure.” There are many economic applications, but this law also helps to understand the dangers of algorithmic decisions, or to explain the difficulty of using the data available since the beginning of the SARS-CoV-2 COVID-19 pandemic.

Continue reading On consequences of Goodhart’s law

The scientific approach in times of crisis

This post was initially written in French, and published in April 2020.

In a conference given on February 13, 2020[i], entitled Against the Method, Didier Raoult stated “I have never done randomized trials […] to do that on infectious diseases, it makes no sense“. This view was repeated in a more detailed article, where Didier Raoult defended (what he called) “the morality [and] the humanism” of the Hippocratic oath against “the method” (and “mathematics”). As he reminds us, doing control groups is “telling the patient that we are going to give him at random either the drug we know works or the drug we do not know works” (Raoult (2020a, 2020b)). While this method of randomized experiments is now hailed in all disciplines – as the Nobel Prize in Economics awarded in 2019 to Esther Duflo, Michael Kremer and Abhijit Banerjee reminds us – how can a researcher take such a position today?
Continue reading The scientific approach in times of crisis