Will I ever be a bayesian statistician ? (part 2)

A few weeks ago, I started a series of posts on the magic of bayesian statistics from the eyes of a muggle (see http://freakonometrics.hypotheses.org/2191). It might be time to go a bit further…. And today, I wanted to discuss the choice of the a priori distribution of the parameter (which was mentioned in the commentary of the previous post). As far as I understood, there are several houses with different ideas on how to choose it.

  • The conjugate house

The first idea (used in the previous post, here) is to consider an exponential distribution. To be formal, those distributions can be written as

http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/bayes-prior-10.gif

(in a form as general as possible), i.e.

http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/bayes-prior-11.gif

Here http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/bayes-prior-13.gif is somehow the new parameter of the distribution. Then, a conjugate priorhttp://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/bayes-prior-12.gif for the parameter http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/bayes-prior-13.gif of the exponential family is given by

http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/bayes-prior-15.gif

where http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/bayes-prior-16.gif (where http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/bayes-prior-17.gif is the dimension of http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/bayes-prior-13.gif).

The conjugate prior is interesting since, when combined with the likelihood (and normalized), produces a posterior distribution which is of the same type as the prior. And a lot of standard distributions have a conjugate prior. E.g.

  • For a Bernoulli distribution, i.e. http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/conj-00c.gif are i.i. with distribution http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/conju-01.gif, assume that the  a priori distribution of http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/conj-00b.gif is http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/conju-02.gif, , then the a posteriori distribution of http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/conj-00.gif is still Beta, with parameters
http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/conju-03.gif
  • For a binomial distribution,  http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/conju-05.gif, assume that the  a prioridistribution of http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/conj-00b.gif is http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/conju-02.gif, then the a posteriori distribution of http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/conj-00.gif is still Beta, with parameters
http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/conj-06.gif
  • For a Negative Binomial distribution, http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/bayes-prior-20.gif,  assume that the  a priori distribution of http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/conj-00b.gif is http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/conju-02.gif, then the a posterioridistribution of http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/conj-00.gif is still Beta, with parameters
http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/conj-08.gif
  • For a Poisson distribution, http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/conj-09.gif, assume that the  a priori distribution of http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/conj-00b.gif is http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/conj-10.gif, then the a posteriori distribution of http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/conj-00.gifis still gamma, with parameter
http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/conj-13.gif
  • For a Geometric distribution,http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/conj-15.gif, assume that the  a prioridistribution of http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/conj-00b.gif is http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/conju-02.gif, then the a posteriori distribution of http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/conj-00.gif is still Beta, with parameters
http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/bayes-prior-22.gif
  • For an Exponential distributionhttp://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/conj-23.gif assume that the  a prioridistribution of http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/conj-00b.gif ishttp://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/bayes-prior-21.gif , then the a posteriori distribution of http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/conj-00.gif is still Gamma, with parameters
http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/bayes-prior-22.gif
  • For a Gaussian distribution, http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/conj-28.gif assume that http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/conj-31.gif, then
http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/conj-35.gif

  • For a gamma distribution, http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/conj-43.gif, assume that the  a prioridistribution of http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/conj-00b.gif is  http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/bayes-000000.gif, then the a posteriori distribution of http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/conj-00.gif is still Gamma, with parameters
http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/bayes-prior-23.gif
  • For a Pareto distribution, , assume that the  a priori distribution of http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/conj-00b.gif is http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/bayes-prior-21.gif, then the a posteriori distribution of http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/conj-00.gif is still Gamma, with parameters

http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/bayes----ooooo.gif

  • The non-informative or vague house

So far, the choice of the prior was not neutral, in the sense that the a priori of the statistician will have an influence on a posteriori distributions (we’ll discuss that point further later on). We could be interested by the case where http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/bayes-prior-12.gif is somehow t neutral. A famous example is the case of  http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/conju-01.gifdistribution. Between 1745 and 1784, Pierre Simon Laplace observed 393,386 birth of boys versus 377,555 birth of girls (or 251,527 boys versus 241,945 girls if we consider the initial article, for birth before 1770). He wanted to quantify the probability that p, the provability to have a boy, exceed 1/2. He assume that a priorip was uniform on the unit interval claiming that it was being as neutral as possible. But it is not that correct.
The idea of noninformative prior is that we should get an equivalent result when considering a transformed parameter. So assume that the parameter is no longer http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/bayes-prior-03.gif, but http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/bayes-prior-05.gif, where http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/bayes-----0000.gif (for some bijective transformation). The distribution (density) of http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/bayes-prior-05.gif is then

http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/bayes-prior-01.gif

Let http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/bayes-prior-02.gif denote Fisher information of parameter http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/bayes-prior-03.gif,

http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/bayes-priori-04.gif

Then, Fisher information of parameter http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/bayes-prior-05.gif is

http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/bayes-prior-06.gif

which can be written

http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/bayes-prior-07.gif

So if we want a distribution invariant by transformation of the parameter (http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/bayes-prior-08.gif), it seems natural to consider

http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/bayes-prior-09.gif

or at least something proportional to that square root, since we want to get a density.
Thus, from Jeffrey’s principle, the prior distribution for a single parameter is noninformative if it is taken proportional to the square root of Fisher’s information measure. For those who want to go further, see Noninformative Priors Do Not Exist or  A Catalog of Noninformative Priors.

  • For the Poisson distribution, the Jeffreys prior for the rate parameter  is
http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/bayes-prior-poisson.gif
  • For the Bernoulli distribution, the Jeffreys prior for the probability parameter  is
http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/bayes-prior-binomial.gif

This is the arcsine distribution and is a beta distribution with parameters 1/2.

  • The expert house

The idea is quite simple. We need a prior distribution so that

http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/bayes-prior-32.gif

But assume that we have already seen a similar problem before. For instance, I remember Eric Parent mentioning the case of river flow models. If we have two similar rivers, then it might be interesting to use information on one river as an a prioriinformation for the second one, something like

http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/bayes-prior-33.gif

I guess it is also possible to use meta-regression to get an aggregation of experts opinion.

To go further on bayesian statistics, I suggest to go on Albus Dumbledore’s og,here, or the the blog of some PhD (and postdoc) students in Hogwarts, there. Or if you can wait, a dozen other posts will come soon (well, let’s hope so). The next one will probably be on a posteriori calculations (which is the natural step since we’ve seen a priori choice here).


2 thoughts on “Will I ever be a bayesian statistician ? (part 2)”

  1. Glad you enjoy Rankin! The best entry on contemporary Scotland, to be sure!

    RESPONSE: a big fan of Rebus… but I was a bit disappointed by the last Rebus story, Exit Music (time to retire ?). I just finished a nice short story, Cool Head.

    http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/.cover_exit_music_s.jpg http://freakonometrics.blog.free.fr/public/perso2/.a_cool_head_main_s.jpg
  2. Two comments: one typo on Jeffreys is confusing because Bill Jefferys (http://quasar.as.utexas.edu/) also is a Bayesian astronomer interested in priors and model choice! Second, as a coincidence, I just finished reading and oggin on Jaynes’ Probability Theory. Jaynes may be one of the last Bayesians to argue about a proper or correct choice of noninformative priors (see the Bertrand paradox entry, http://xianblog.wordpress.com/2011/…) Indeed, not only non-informative priors do not exist, but furthermore they are not unique!!! To choose among them is a matter of paradigm, not of Truth….

    RESPONSE: Thanks Albus for the comment. I saw the post on your blog, and I bought Jaynes’ Probability Theory. Now I have to wait to receive it (read it and enjoy it… but first I have to admit I want to finish my Rankin’ books). And thanks for the typo, I’ll fix it !

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.