Assurance et discrimination, quel rôle pour les actuaires ?

Le rôle essentiel d’un actuaire en charge de la tarification est la segmentation du portefeuille (ou « insurance classification » en anglais), correspondant à une activité de discrimination (mathématiquement parlant) au sens où l’actuaire va chercher les variables les plus « discriminantes », pour en expliquer une autre (en lien avec la sinistralité). Mais au sens juridique, discriminer, c’est interdit par la loi, ce qui place l’actuaire dans une position souvent délicate et complexe.

Continue reading Assurance et discrimination, quel rôle pour les actuaires ?

Could there be incentives to cycle through a red light?

This is of course a rhetorical question! Because cyclists must stop when the light is red! … But … there is always that moment, on a bicycle, when you stop, and  then you say to yourself

the worst part is that the lights are badly regulated, and I know that the next one will also be red once I will reach it … whereas if I had passed, I would have had the next one, and who knows, maybe a green wave afterwards?

Not having wanted to try the experiment with my bike, I wanted to try using simulations, on my computer.

Let us assume that in my city, there are red lights every 250 m, and they go from red to green in 1 minute, and similarly from green to red. Then, I can use a simple loop, where I compute the time from home, each time I pass a light: either the light is green, I go through, and I do not wait; or the light is red, then I wait, until the end of the minute. Here is the code. First, I define the constant parameter, with lights every 250 m, light turning either red or green every 1 minute, and I assume a constant speed here, of 15/60 km per min (or 15km per hour).

v = 15/60
d = .250
t = 1

Suppose that the office is at 10 km from home. The code to compute the time is simply (I do add a random noise on the time it takes to reach the next light, I will get back to that later on)

Dist = seq(0,10,by=.25)
Time1=rep(NA,length(D))
Time1[1]==0
for(k in 2:length(Dist)){
  noise=rnorm(1,sd=.05)
Time1[k]=Time1[k-1]+d/v+noise
if((floor(Time1[k])%%2==0)&(k<length(Dist))) Time1[k]=ceiling(Time1[k])
}

I can now visualize myself on my bike

T=seq(0,60,by=1/60)
colr = c("red","green")
plot(T,T*v,col="white")
for(k in 1:40){
points(T,rep(d*k,length(T)),cex=.3,pch=15,col=colr[rep(1:2,each=t*60)])
}
points(Time1,Dist,pch=19,cex=.5)

Here, it took me about 51 min to reach the office. And each time I have a red light, I stop and wait. Here is the distribution of the time it will take, as a function of my speed

simul = function(v=.250,sd=.05){
  Dist = seq(0,10,by=.25)
  Time1=Time2=rep(NA,length(D))
  Time1[1]=Time2[1]=0
  for(k in 2:length(Dist)){
    noise=rnorm(1,sd=sd)
    Time1[k]=Time1[k-1]+d/v+noise
    if((floor(Time1[k])%%2==0)&(k<length(Dist))) Time1[k]=ceiling(Time1[k])
  }
  max(Time1)
}
S=function(v=.250,sd=.05,n=1000){
  Vectorize(function(x) simul(v=x,sd=sd))(rep(v,n))
}
vit = seq(.2,.3,length=101)
MS = Vectorize(function(x) S(v=x,sd=.05))(vit)
qMSsup = apply(MS,2,function(x) quantile(x,.95))
qMSinf = apply(MS,2,function(x) quantile(x,.05))
MSmed = apply(MS,2,function(x) quantile(x,.5))
MSmean = apply(MS,2,mean)
par(mfrow = c(1,1))
plot(vit,MSmed,type="l")
polygon(c(vit,rev(vit)),c(qMSinf,rev(qMSsup)),col="light blue",border=NA)
lines(vit,MSmed,lwd=2)

Obviously, on average, the faster I cycle, the shorter the ride will be. Of course, 40 min is not a (real) lower bound : if I go much faster, it can be a rather quick ride

Now, consider a simple rhetorical alternative. What if I decide to go through a red light (after checking that there is no danger), say, with 1 chance of out 20 ?

simul_random = function(v=.250,sd=.05){
  Dist = seq(0,10,by=.25)
  Time1=rep(NA,length(D))
  Time1[1]=0
  for(k in 2:length(Dist)){
    noise=rnorm(1,sd=sd)
    Time1[k]=Time1[k-1]+d/v+noise
    red = sample(c(0,1),size=1,prob = c(.95,.05))
    if((floor(Time1[k])%%2==0)&(k<length(Dist))&(red == 0)) Time1[k]=ceiling(Time1[k])
  }
  max(Time1)
}

Here, 1 chance out of 20 could mean that on a 10 km ride, I wil always stop : first, I need a red light, and then 95% of the time, I stop. Here is the average distribution, with confidence bands

S_random=function(v=.250,sd=.05,n=1000){
  Vectorize(function(x) simul_random(v=x,sd=sd))(rep(v,n))
}
MS3 = Vectorize(function(x) S_random(v=x,sd=.05))(vit)
qMSsup3 = apply(MS3,2,function(x) quantile(x,.95))
qMSinf3 = apply(MS3,2,function(x) quantile(x,.05))
MSmed3 = apply(MS3,2,function(x) quantile(x,.5))

It is possible to compare the two actually (on average times)

plot(MSmed,MSmed3,type="l")
abline(a=0,b=1,col="red",lty=2)
plot(MSmed,(MSmed-MSmed3)/MSmed*100,type="l")

which means that, somehow I can save some time, maybe from 3% to 5% if I do not cycle to fast, otherwise probably less than 2%. I would not claim, here, that it is worth it.

Consider another rhetorical alternative. What if I decide to go through the red light only if it is during the very first second ?

simul_1sec = function(v=.250,sd=.05){
  Dist = seq(0,10,by=.25)
  Time1=rep(NA,length(D))
  Time1[1]=0
  for(k in 2:length(Dist)){
    noise=rnorm(1,sd=sd)
    Time1[k]=Time1[k-1]+d/v+noise
    if((floor(Time1[k])%%2==0)&(k<length(Dist))&(Time1[k]-floor(Time1[k])>1/60)) Time1[k]=ceiling(Time1[k])
  }
  max(Time1)
}

Here is the time it takes to go to the office

and here is the potential gain

We can now clearly see the impact of those nonlinearities : with my average 15 km per hour speed, I can save 8% of the time if I go through red during the very first second. Of course, I will never do such a think, but mathematically speaking, it is stricking. Here is the gain for the first 2 seconds (out of a full minute)

so the gain can be about 12%. And now, what if we remove the noise – or more precisely, what if the standard deviation become 0.001 instead of 0.05. Here is the first distribution of the time (when I stop at each red light, and wait)

If I do not go fast enough, I will stop at almost each light, and wait until the end of the minute: going at 20 km per hour or 24 km per hour is exactly the same. But if I can go slightly faster than 25km per hour, that is awesome, and I have my green wave. Now, her is the graph I get when I cycle through the red light only in the very first second

This is now the gain

I can save up to 40% of the time, and more realistically, my 55 min ride could now be a 40 min ride. Which is substantial.

But on that one, observe that another strategy is also possible : what if I do not cycle through red light, but I simply cycle +1% faster ?

simul_faster = function(v=.250,sd=.05){
  Dist = seq(0,10,by=.25)
  Time1=rep(NA,length(D))
  Time1[1]=0
  for(k in 2:length(Dist)){
    noise=rnorm(1,sd=sd)
    Time1[k]=Time1[k-1]+d/(v*1.01)+noise
    if((floor(Time1[k])%%2==0)&(k<length(Dist))&(Time1[k]-floor(Time1[k])>1/60)) Time1[k]=ceiling(Time1[k])
  }
  max(Time1)
}

We have a similar result here, since riding 1% faster can actually help me save up to 50% of my time ! and (more realistically) if I ride 1% faster with a large random noise in the time between two light, I get almost the same as previously (when passing through the red light)

Again, my point here is not that we should cycle through a red light, of course not. But there may be accumulation of (small) nonlinear effects that might have a major impact at the end. And I believe that the best way to avoid this is to offer a green wave to cyclists, assuming that they ride at a reasonnable speed…

A new GEE method to account for heteroscedasticity using asymmetric least-square regressions

Our paper, with Amadou Barry and Karim Oualkacha, a new GEE method to account for heteroscedasticity using asymmetric least-square regressions is now published in the Journal of Applied Statistics

Generalized estimating equations (GEE) are widely used to analyze longitudinal data; however, they are not appropriate for heteroscedastic data, because they only estimate regressor effects on the mean response – and therefore do not account for data heterogeneity. Here, we combine the GEE with the asymmetric least squares (expectile) regression to derive a new class of estimators, which we call generalized expectile estimating equations (GEEE). The GEEE model estimates regressor effects on the expectiles of the response distribution, which provides a detailed view of regressor effects on the entire response distribution. In addition to capturing data heteroscedasticity, the GEEE extends the various working correlation structures to account for within-subject dependence. We derive the asymptotic properties of the GEEE estimators and propose a robust estimator of its covariance matrix for inference (see our R package, github.com/AmBarry/expectgee). Our simulations show that the GEEE estimator is non-biased and efficient, and our real data analysis shows it captures heteroscedasticity.

Predicting Drought and Subsidence Risks in France

New paper with Molly James and Hani Ali, now available on https://arxiv.org/abs/2107.07668

The economic consequences of drought episodes are increasingly important, although they are often difficult to apprehend in part because of the complexity of the underlying mechanisms. In this article, we will study one of the consequences of drought, namely the risk of subsidence (or more specifically clay shrinkage induced subsidence), for which insurance has been mandatory in France for several decades. Using data obtained from several insurers, representing about a quarter of the household insurance market, over the past twenty years, we propose some statistical models to predict the frequency but also the intensity of these droughts, for insurers, showing that climate change will have probably major economic consequences on this risk. But even if we use more advanced models than standard regression-type models (here random forests to capture non linearity and cross effects), it is still difficult to predict the economic cost of subsidence claims, even if all geophysical and climatic information is available.

Collaborative Insurance Sustainability and Network Structure

Our joint paper, with Lariosse Kouakou, Matthias Löwe, Philipp Ratz and Franck Vermet, entitled “Collaborative Insurance Sustainability and Network Structure” is now available on Arxiv,

The peer-to-peer (P2P) economy has been growing with the advent of the internet, with well known brands such as Uber or Airbnb being examples thereof. In the insurance sector the approach is still in its infancy, but some companies have started to explore P2P-based collaborative insurance products (eg. Lemonade in the U.S. or Inspeer in France). The actuarial literature only recently started to consider those risk sharing mechanisms, as in Denuit and Robert (2020) or Feng et al. (2021). In this paper, describe and analyse such a P2P product, with some reciprocal risk sharing contracts. Here, we consider the case where policyholders still have an insurance contract, but the first self-insurance layer, below the deductible, can be shared with friends. We study the impact of the shape of the network (through the distribution of degrees) on the risk reduction. We consider also some optimal setting of the reciprocal commitments, and discuss the introduction of contracts with friends of friends to mitigate some possible drawbacks of having people without enough connections to exchange risks.

United As One, IME 2021

Next week, colleagues from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign and the Pennsylvania State University in the United States, Ulm University in Germany, and the University of New South Wales (UNSW Sydney) in Australia organize the 24th International Congress on Insurance: Mathematics and Economics, aka IME2021. I will present our joint work, with Michel Denuit and Julien Trufin, Autocalibration for Insurance Pricing with Machine Learning, Philipp Ratz will present our joint work on peer-to-peer insurance model. I will also chair some sessions, and participate to a round table on Thursday morning (Montréal time).

Changement Climatique et Assurance

Impact du changement climatique

Au regard des données des 40 dernières années la fréquence des catastrophes météorologiques et climatiques ne cesse d’augmenter dans le monde. Et les pertes assurées également, en grande partie à cause du développement de l’assurance. La croissance économique, l’augmentation des richesses, l’industrialisation de zones vulnérables et la concentration des populations expliquent une grande partie de l’augmentation, comme le note Botzen et al. (2010).

Figure 1 : Nombre de catastrophes météorologiques et climatiques dans le monde, à partir des données de Munich Re (2019)[i].

Figure 2 : Montants des sinistres causés par les catastrophes météorologiques et climatiques dans le monde, à partir des données de Munich Re (2019).

Les liens entre cette augmentation de la fréquence et de la gravité de ces catastrophes (allant des vagues de chaleur aux épisodes froids, des sécheresses aux pluies diluviennes, ou encore aux tempêtes et ouragans) et le changement climatique sont encore mal connus. Comme le notait IPCC (2013), de faibles changements sur la distribution moyenne des températures peuvent avoir de gros impacts sur les quantiles élevés. Au cours des 10 dernières années, le coût moyenne des aléas naturels en France s’élève à presque 3 milliards d’euros par an, et ce, pour les seuls assureurs. Et lors de la COP21, les assureurs français estimaient que ce coût pourrait doubler dans les prochaines années (en euros constants), la moitié de cette charge étant expliquée par des facteurs liés aux évolutions socio-économiques (augmentation de la somme assurée en grande partie, mais aussi migration vers des zones à risque), et la moitié étant expliquée par des facteurs liés au changement climatique.

Mais au-delà de ces catastrophes, le changement climatique impacte tous les secteurs de l’assurance. L’augmentation des précipitations en Europe (non seulement en moyenne, mais aussi avec une hausse des crues éclair) va affecter les infrastructures souterraines, ou situées à proximité des cours d’eau. Les propriétés situées sur les côtes sont menacées par l’élévation du niveau des mers. Les risques liés aux inondations constituent une catégorie de catastrophe très impactée par le changement climatique, en particulier les risques de submersion marine et les inondations par débordement et ruissellement. Un autre risque est celui lié aux sécheresses, qui endommage aussi les bâtiments par affaissement des sols. La canicule de l’été 2003 en France a causé une hausse des réclamations en assurance construction de l’ordre de 20 %. En assurance vie, la canicule de 2003, exceptionnelle par sa durée, a là aussi montré l’impact potentiel du changement climatique sur les personnes les plus vulnérables (enfants très jeunes, personnes âgées, et malades chroniques). L’assurance agricole est également impactée par les sécheresses et les inondations. Les sécheresses augmentent aussi le risque d’incendie, pouvant détruire forêts et récoltes.

La couverture du risque, entre assureurs et état

Les assureurs se sont efforcés d’offrir des couvertures dans la mesure du possible. Ces solutions font souvent intervenir les compagnies d’assurance. Dans certains pays, les assureurs n’interviennent pas, et c’est l’État qui prend à sa charge les sinistres (à partir du budget ou d’un fonds spécifique alimenté par une taxe sur les contrats d’assurance). Dans le cas de la France, il existe un mécanisme mixte, appelé mécanisme Cat Nat, basé sur un mélange d’assurance obligatoire et d’intervention publique. Ce subtil équilibre entre les assureurs privés et ; état évolue dans le temps, car tous ont peur des conséquences financières des catastrophes. En particulier, l’état qui avait offert sa caution – par exemple en tant qu’ « assureur en dernier ressort » dans le mécanisme français – se voit contraint de faire figurer cet engagement dans son budget.

Les assureurs sont d’autant plus impliqués que les mesures de prévention, qui doivent être pris au niveau collectif, peuvent avoir un impact très important sur le risque, avec un coût négligeable par rapport aux gains. En 2004, la Banque Mondiale avait ainsi calculé que pour toutes les catastrophes naturelles survenues dans les années 1990, 40 milliards d’€ investis dans des mesures de prévention auraient permis de réduire le coût total de 280 milliards d’€. On retrouve le même ordre de grandeur lorsque l’Association of British Insurers déclarait que chaque livre sterling dépensée dans des mesures de prévention permettrait d’économiser 6 livres sterling en coûts de réparation, lors d’inondations.

Botzen, W. J. W., van den Bergh, J. C. J. M., and Bouwer, L. M. (2010). Climate change and increased risk for the insurance sector: a global perspective and an assessment for the netherlands. Natural Hazards, 52(3), 577–598.

[i] Munich Re NatCatSERVICE

Incertitude(s)

Cet été, le 7 août, je participerai au marathon des sciences, dans le cadre du 30ème Festival d’Astronomie de Fleurance, sur le thème “Incertitude(s)”. Malheureusement, comme nous ne rentrons pas en France cet été, mon intervention serra virtuelle, ou disons à distance. J’essayerai de mettre à la rentrée la vidéo de mon intervention, sur le thème assurance : des incertitudes individuelles aux certitudes collectives,

L’assurance repose sur l’idée de la mutualisation des risques, un grand nombre de personnes contribuant à alléger les malheurs d’un petit nombre d’entre eux. Ce transfert de risque se fait par l’intermédiaire d’un assureur qui, sur la base d’un contrat (dit aléatoire), vend la promesse d’une indemnité financière en cas de survenance d’un évènement incertain à la signature. L’assureur se doit d’imaginer les scénarios futurs, et de quantifier du mieux possible leurs probabilités afin de pouvoir satisfaire ses engagements, de telle sorte que les contributions des assurés permettent effectivement d’indemniser ceux qui ont eu un accident. Car le risque et l’incertitude ne disparaissent jamais, les actuaires se contentent d’essayer de les maîtriser autant que possible.

An Open Lab-Notebook Experiment

Search OpenEdition Search

You will be redirected to OpenEdition Search