Somewhere else (or maybe not) part 200

Usually, blogging is a rush. There are a lot of posts I have to finish, and if I do not post frequently, I have the feeling that – somehow – I do not belong to the blogosphere any more. There is so much to be done, so many posts to finalize, so many draft that I started, or material used to generate only on graph in some slides (that might deserve a long and detailed post). If instead of looking forward, I take a short beak, and look backward, and I am always surprised to see what I have done. I am always puzzled when googling something that I would like to know more about, one of my own posts appears, or reappears.

Usually, in those somewhere else, I mention posts and articles here and there, outside my own blog. For the 100th post, I mentioned 100 blogs and websites worth following. For this 200th post, I will mention 200 posts worth reading, on my own blog !

Continue reading Somewhere else (or maybe not) part 200

Somewhere else, part 199

As usual, some posts and articles worth reading

Continue reading Somewhere else, part 199

Chercheur en pantoufles

J’ai eu l’immense plaisir, pendant mes premiers jours de vacances, de lire La lune est blanche d’Emmannuel et François Lepage. Des deux frères, le premier est illustrateur, et le second photographe. Et ils publient ici une bande dessinée (pour faire simple) narrant leur voyage en Antarctique. On peut d’ailleurs y voir une suite à Voyage aux îles de la Désolation qu’avait signé Emmanuel Lepage il y a quelques années (tant sur le thème que du point de vue chronologique).

Mais avant d’aller plus loin, je me dois de remettre un peu en contexte. Après quatre années passées à Montréal, au Canada, j’ai progressivement pris conscience de ce que peut être le Nord. Et à quel point ce Nord peut faire partie de l’identité canadienne (je conseille d’ailleurs Un Dit Du Nord, de Louis-Edmond Hamelin, qui revient longuement sur le concept de norditude). En plus, au printemps dernier, ma voisine (à l’UQAM mais aussi sur hypotheses) Elisabeth Vallet m’avait sollicité pour intervenir (en clôture) d’une soirée autour du thème à qui appartient le pôle nord. J’avais accepté car Philippe Réka était de la partie, et j’ai toujours un immense plaisir à le revoir (il a en plus une la gentillesse de venir chanter une berceuse – en norvégien – à ma fille). Et j’ai eu l’opportunité de beaucoup lire sur le sujet, et de découvrir un univers réellement fascinant.

Continue reading Chercheur en pantoufles

Somewhere else, part 198

Was 2014 the worst year, ever?

I guess we need to wait a bit longer, just to be sure….

Some posts and articles worth reading,

Continue reading Somewhere else, part 198

Somewhere else, part 197

Some posts and articles worth reading

Continue reading Somewhere else, part 197

Somewhere else, part 196

Some posts and articles worth reading,

Continue reading Somewhere else, part 196

Somewhere else, part 195

Some posts and articles worth reading

Continue reading Somewhere else, part 195

Somewhere else, part 194

Some posts and articles worth reading

Continue reading Somewhere else, part 194

Back in Leuven, for a talk on Nonparametric Estimation

I am currently in Leuven for a few days. It is always a pleasure to be back to the place where I defended my PhD, a few years ago.

I will give a talk, tomorrow, at noon, on nonparametric (and kernel related) inference for quantiles and risk measures, inspired by recent work with Emmanuel Flachaire. Our first paper log-transform kernel density estimationof income distribution is online  on http://papers.ssrn.com/id=2514882, and should appear soon. Another one it able to be finalised, soon.

Somewhere else, part 193

Some posts and articles worth reading

Continue reading Somewhere else, part 193

Somewhere else, part 192

Some posts and articles worth reading

Continue reading Somewhere else, part 192

Somewhere else, part 191

Some posts and articles worth reading,

Continue reading Somewhere else, part 191

Names in the U.S., from James Smith to Jose Rodriguez

Two weeks ago, @mona published an interesting post on her blog, about a difficult question, What’s The Most Common Name In America? There were stats about first names, in the U.S., and last names, too. Those informations are – somehow – easy to get. But usually, it is more complicated to get the first and the last name together. For confidentiality issues ! Datasets – the ones I deal with – are supposed to be anonymized, so I never see the first and the last names.  In a previous post, a few years ago, I did mention the so-called Social Security Death Master File. In that file, we have Social Security numbers, with the date of birth, the date of death as well as the first and the last name. So I did use those files to get stats about the first and the last names of American citizens. Of course, it is very restrictive. I have only U.S. citizens that have a Social Security number (which is not compulsary in the U.S. as far as I understood) and who passed away (as mentioned in the name of the dataset: the death master file). Another great thing about that dataset is that I have the date of birth, so I can look at some cohort effect (see opendata.stackexchange for an interesting discussion on that dataset).

Continue reading Names in the U.S., from James Smith to Jose Rodriguez

Somewhere else, part 190

Some posts and articles worth reading

Continue reading Somewhere else, part 190