Category Archives: econometrics

Econometrics vs. Machine Learning with Temporal Patterns

A few months ago, I did publish a (long) post entitled ‘some thoughts on economics, mathematics, econometrics, machine learning, etc‘. In that post, I was discussing possible differences between foundations of econometrics, and machine learning. I wanted to get back today on an important point, related to training/sampling datasets, when we have temporal data.

I was discussing this morning, with a student of the Data Science for Actuaries program, an interesting point related to claim frequency models, for insurance ratemaking. Since the goal is to predict claims frequency (to assess the level of the insurance premium), he suggested to use old data to train the model, and more recent one to test it. The problem is that the model did not incorporate any temporal pattern, and we got surprising results.

Consider here a simple dataset,

> set.seed(1)
> n=50000
> X1=runif(n)
> T=sample(2000:2015,size=n,replace=TRUE)
> L=exp(-3+X1-(T-2000)/20)
> E=rbeta(n,5,1)
> Y=rpois(n,L*E)
> B=data.frame(Y,X1,L,T,E)

Claims frequency is driven by a Poisson process, with one covariate, X1, and we assume that the intensity decreases (with an exponential rate). Consider here a standard linear regression, without any time effect

> reg=glm(Y~X1+offset(log(E)),data=B,
+ family=poisson)

We can also compute the empirical annualized claims frequency

> u=seq(0,1,by=.01)
> v=predict(reg,newdata=data.frame(X1=u,E=1))
> p=function(x){
+   B=B[abs(B$X1-x)<.1,]
+   sum(B$Y)/sum(B$E)
+ }
> vp=Vectorize(p)(seq(.05,.95,by=.1))

and plot the two curves on the same graph,

> plot(seq(.05,.95,by=.1),vp,type="b")
> lines(u,exp(v),lty=2,col="red")

This is what we usually do in econometrics. In machine learning, and more specifically to assess the quality of the model, and for model selection, it is common to split the dataset in two parts. A training sample, and a validation sample. Consider some randomized training/validation samples, then fit a model on the training sample, and finally use it to get a prediction,

> idx=sample(1:nrow(B),size=nrow(B)*7/8)
> B_a=B[idx,]
> B_t=B[-idx,]
> reg=glm(Y~X1+offset(log(E)),data=B_a,
+ family=poisson)
> u=seq(0,1,by=.01)
> v=predict(reg,newdata=data.frame(X1=u,E=1))
> p=function(x){
+   B=B_a[abs(B_a$X1-x)<.1,]
+   sum(B$Y)/sum(B$E)
+ }
> vp_a=Vectorize(p)(seq(.05,.95,by=.1))
> plot(seq(.05,.95,by=.1),vp_a,col="blue")
> lines(u,exp(v),lty=2)
> p=function(x){
+   B=B_t[abs(B_t$X1-x)<.1,]
+   sum(B$Y)/sum(B$E)
+ }
> vp_t=Vectorize(p)(seq(.05,.95,by=.1))
> lines(seq(.05,.95,by=.1),vp_t,col="red")

The blue curve is the prediction on the training sample (as we usually do in econometrics), but then the red curve is the prediction on the testing sample. Here, volatility probably comes from the small size of the testing sample (1 observation out of 8).

Now, what if we use the year as a splitting criteria : we fit a model on old years to fit a model, and we test it on recent years,

> B_a=subset(B,T<2014)
> B_t=subset(B,T>=2014)
> reg=glm(Y~X1+offset(log(E)),data=B_a,family=poisson)
> u=seq(0,1,by=.01)
> v=predict(reg,newdata=data.frame(X1=u,E=1))
> p=function(x){
+   B=B_a[abs(B_a$X1-x)<.1,]
+   sum(B$Y)/sum(B$E)
+ }
> vp_a=Vectorize(p)(seq(.05,.95,by=.1))
> plot(seq(.05,.95,by=.1),vp_a,col="blue")
> lines(u,exp(v),lty=2)
> p=function(x){
+   B=B_t[abs(B_t$X1-x)<.1,]
+   sum(B$Y)/sum(B$E)
+ }
> vp_t=Vectorize(p)(seq(.05,.95,by=.1))
> lines(seq(.05,.95,by=.1),vp_t,col="red")

Clearly, we miss something here…

We were looking at such a graph this morning, and it took me some time to understand how training and validation samples were designed, and that there was a possible temporal effect (actually, this morning, it was based on a 3 year training sample, and a 1 year validation sample).

Since there is a temporal pattern, let us capture it. As an econometrician, let me use a regression model

> reg=glm(Y~X1+T+offset(log(E)),data=B,
+ family=poisson)
> C=coefficients(reg)
> u=seq(1999,2016,by=.1)
> v=exp(-(u-2000)/20-3)
> plot(2000:2015,exp(C[1]+C[3]*(2000:2015)))
> lines(u,v,lty=2,col="red")

(I focus only on the evolution of the temporal variate on that graph).

Here, we use a linear model, but there are usually no reason to assume linearity. So we might consider splines

> library(splines)
> reg=glm(Y~X1+bs(T)+offset(log(E)),
+ data=B,family=poisson)
> u=seq(1999,2016,by=.1)
> v=exp(-(u-2000)/20-3)
> v2=predict(reg,newdata=data.frame(X1=0,
+ T=2000:2015,E=1))
> plot(2000:2015,exp(v2),type="b")
> lines(u,v,lty=2,col="red")

But here again, why should we assume that there is an underlying smooth function? There might be some ruptures… So let us consider a regression on factors

> reg=glm(Y~0+X1+as.factor(T)+offset(log(E)),
+ data=B,family=poisson)
> C=coefficients(reg)
> u=seq(1999,2016,by=.1)
> v=exp(-(u-2000)/20-3)
> plot(2000:2015,exp(C[2:17]),type="b")
> lines(u,v,lty=2,col="red")

An alternative might be to consider some more general model, like a regression tree

> library(rpart)
> reg=rpart(Y~X1+T+offset(log(E)),data=B,
+ method="poisson",cp=1e-4)
> p=function(t){
+   B=B[B$T==t,]
+   B$E=1
+   mean(predict(reg,newdata=B))
+ }
> y_m=Vectorize(function(t) p(t))(2000:2015)
> u=seq(1999,2016,by=.1)
> v=exp(-(u-2000)/20-3+.5)
> plot(2000:2015,y_m,ylim=c(.02,.085),type="b")
> lines(u,v,lty=2,col="red")

Here, it seems that something went wrong. I guess it’s coming from the exposure. So consider a simplier model, on the annualized frequency, and with weights that are related to the exposure

> reg=rpart(Y/E~X1+T,data=B,weights=B$E,cp=1e-4)
> p=function(t){
+   B=B[B$T==t,]
+   B$E=1
+   mean(predict(reg,newdata=B))
+ }
> y_m=Vectorize(function(t) p(t))(2000:2015)
> u=seq(1999,2016,by=.1)
> v=exp(-(u-2000)/20-3+.5)
> plot(2000:2015,y_m,ylim=c(.02,.085),type="b")
> lines(u,v,lty=2,col="red")

That was for the econometrician perspective. With a machine learning perspective, consider a training sample (here based on old data) and a validation sample (based on more recent ones)

> B_a=subset(B,T<2014)
> B_t=subset(B,T>=2014)

If we consider a model, it is easy to get a prediction on recent years, even if the model was designed to model older ones,

> reg_a=glm(Y~X1+T+offset(log(E)),
+ data=B_a,family=poisson)
> C=coefficients(reg_a)
> u=seq(1999,2016,by=.1)
> v=exp(-(u-2000)/20-3)
> plot(2000:2015,exp(C[1]+C[3]*c(2000:2013,
+ NA,NA)),type="b")
> lines(u,v,lty=2,col="red")
> points(2014:2015,exp(C[1]+C[3]*2014:2015),
+ pch=19,col="blue")

But if we use years as factors, things are more complicated.

> reg_a=glm(Y~0+X1+as.factor(T)+offset(log(E)),
+ data=B_a,family=poisson)
> C=coefficients(reg_a)
> RMSE=function(A){
+   L=exp(C[1]*B_t$X1+ A[1]*(B_t$T==2014) + A[2]*(B_t$T==2015))
+   Y_t=L*B_t$E
+   sum( (Y_t - B_t$Y )^2)}
> i=optim(c(.4,.4),RMSE)$par
> plot(2000:2015,c(exp(C[2:15]),NA,NA),)
> u=seq(1999,2016,by=.1)
> v=exp(-(u-2000)/20-3)
> lines(u,v,lty=2,col="red")
> points(2014:2015,exp(i),pch=19,col="blue")

becase we need to get a prediction on levels that were not in our training sample. Here, we minimize the RMSE to quantify factor levels for recent years. And the output is not that bad.

So yes, it is possible to get a training dataset on older data, and test it on recent years. But one should be careful, and take into account, properly, temporal patterns.

Modèle de régression et interaction(s) entre facteurs

Dans un modèle de régression, on veut écrire

Quand on se limite à un modèle linéaire, on écrit

ou encore

Mais on de doute que l’on rate quelque chose… en particulier, on va rater toutes les interactions possibles. On peut croiser les variables, et supposer que

qui peut s’étendre d’avantage, à l’ordre 3,

voire davantage.

Supposons que nos variables  soient ici qualitatives, et plus précisément binaires. Prenons un exemple simple, avec des données (classiques) en risque de crédit1. On peut trouver la base via

library(evtree)
db=GermanCredit

ou encore directement

myVariableNames = c("checking_status","duration","credit_history",
"purpose","credit_amount","savings","employment","installment_rate",
"personal_status","other_parties","residence_since","property_magnitude",
"age","other_payment_plans","housing","existing_credits","job",
"num_dependents","telephone","foreign_worker","class")

GermanCredit = read.table(
"http://archive.ics.uci.edu/ml/machine-learning-databases/statlog/german/german.data",
header=FALSE,col.names=myVariableNames)

Retenons pour commencer trois variables explicatives,

db=data.frame(Y=GermanCredit$class-1,
X1=GermanCredit$checking_status%in%c("A12","A13"),
X2=GermanCredit$credit_history%in%c("A30","A31"),
X3=GermanCredit$savings%in%c("A61","A62"))
reg=glm(Y~X1+X2+X3,data=db,family=binomial)
summary(reg)

La régression sans interaction donne ici

Call:
glm(formula = Y ~ X1 + X2 + X3, family = binomial, data = db)

Deviance Residuals: 
    Min       1Q   Median       3Q      Max  
-1.5431  -0.8421  -0.6295   1.3994   1.9999  

Coefficients:
            Estimate Std. Error z value Pr(>|z|)    
(Intercept)  -1.8544     0.1699 -10.915  < 2e-16 ***
X1TRUE        0.3363     0.1496   2.249   0.0245 *  
X2TRUE        1.3462     0.2347   5.735 9.76e-09 ***
X3TRUE        1.0001     0.1787   5.596 2.19e-08 ***
---
Signif. codes:  0 '***' 0.001 '**' 0.01 '*' 0.05 '.' 0.1 ' ' 1

(Dispersion parameter for binomial family taken to be 1)

    Null deviance: 1221.7  on 999  degrees of freedom
Residual deviance: 1143.6  on 996  degrees of freedom
AIC: 1151.6

Number of Fisher Scoring iterations: 4

Il existe plusieurs interactions possibles ici (limitons nous aux paires). C’est ce que l’on observe quand on fait la régression

reg=glm(Y~X1+X2+X3+X1:X2+X1:X3+X2:X3,data=db,family=binomial)
summary(reg)

Call:
glm(formula = Y ~ X1 + X2 + X3 + X1:X2 + X1:X3 + X2:X3, family = binomial, 
    data = db)

Deviance Residuals: 
    Min       1Q   Median       3Q      Max  
-1.5369  -0.8281  -0.6439   1.3954   1.9638  

Coefficients:
              Estimate Std. Error z value Pr(>|z|)    
(Intercept)   -1.77109    0.20070  -8.825  < 2e-16 ***
X1TRUE         0.30296    0.33737   0.898 0.369186    
X2TRUE         0.88353    0.54255   1.628 0.103421    
X3TRUE         0.87709    0.22583   3.884 0.000103 ***
X1TRUE:X2TRUE -0.37917    0.49343  -0.768 0.442225    
X1TRUE:X3TRUE  0.09178    0.37278   0.246 0.805522    
X2TRUE:X3TRUE  0.80923    0.58185   1.391 0.164293    
---
Signif. codes:  0 '***' 0.001 '**' 0.01 '*' 0.05 '.' 0.1 ' ' 1

(Dispersion parameter for binomial family taken to be 1)

    Null deviance: 1221.7  on 999  degrees of freedom
Residual deviance: 1141.0  on 993  degrees of freedom
AIC: 1155

Number of Fisher Scoring iterations: 4

On peut faire un dessin pour visualiser les interactions : on a trois sommets (nos trois variables), et on visualiser les interactions

indices=cbind(c(1,2,3),c(1,1,2),c(2,3,3))
k=3
theta=pi/2+2*pi*(0:(k-1))/k
sommetX=cos(theta)
sommetY=sin(theta)
plot(sommetX,sommetY,cex=1,axes=FALSE,xlab="",ylab="",
xlim=c(-1.5,1.5),ylim=c(-1.5,1.5))
for(i in 1:nrow(indices)){
segments(sommetX[indices[i,2]],sommetY[indices[i,2]],
sommetX[indices[i,3]],sommetY[indices[i,3]],col="grey")
text(mean(sommetX[indices[i,2:3]]),mean(sommetY[indices[i,2:3]]),
trunc(10000*coefficients(reg)[1+k+i])/10000)
}
points(sommetX,sommetY,cex=6,pch=19,col="yellow")
points(sommetX,sommetY,cex=6,pch=1)
text(sommetX,sommetY,1:k)

ce qui donne ici, pour nos trois variables

Ce modèle pourrait sembler incomplet, car on ne regarde que les interactions entre les modalités, par paires. En fait, c’est parce qu’il manque (visuellement) les variables non-croisées. On peut les rajouter si on veut (au risque de surcharger le dessin)

cercle=function(c,r,cl) lines(c[1]+r*cos(seq(0,2*pi,length=501)),
c[2]+r*sin(seq(0,2*pi,length=501)),col=cl)

reg=glm(Y~X1+X2+X3+X1:X2+X1:X3+X2:X3,data=db,family=binomial)
indices=cbind(c(1,2,3),c(1,1,2),c(2,3,3))
k=3
theta=pi/2+2*pi*(0:(k-1))/k
sommetX=cos(theta)
sommetY=sin(theta)
plot(sommetX,sommetY,cex=1,axes=FALSE,xlab="",ylab="",xlim=c(-1.5,1.5),ylim=c(-1.5,1.5))
for(i in 1:nrow(indices)){
segments(sommetX[indices[i,2]],sommetY[indices[i,2]],
sommetX[indices[i,3]],sommetY[indices[i,3]],col="grey")
text(mean(sommetX[indices[i,2:3]]),mean(sommetY[indices[i,2:3]]),
trunc(10000*coefficients(reg)[1+k+i])/10000)
}
for(i in 1:k){
cercle(c(cos(theta)[i]*1.18,sin(theta)[i]*1.18),.18,"grey")
text(cos(theta)[i]*1.35,sin(theta)[i]*1.35,
trunc(10000*coefficients(reg)[1+i])/10000)
}
points(sommetX,sommetY,cex=6,pch=19,col="yellow")
points(sommetX,sommetY,cex=6,pch=1)
text(sommetX,sommetY,1:k)

soit ici

Si on change le ‘sens‘ de nos variables (en recodant a l’envers, en permutant les vrais et les faux), on obtient le graphique suivant

dbinv=db
dbinv[,2:k]=1-dbinv[,2:k]
reg=glm(Y~X1+X2+X3+X1:X2+X1:X3+X2:X3,data=dbinv,family=binomial)
indices=cbind(c(1,2,3),c(1,1,2),c(2,3,3))
k=3
theta=pi/2+2*pi*(0:(k-1))/k
sommetX=cos(theta)
sommetY=sin(theta)
plot(sommetX,sommetY,cex=1,axes=FALSE,xlab="",ylab="",xlim=c(-1.5,1.5),ylim=c(-1.5,1.5))
for(i in 1:nrow(indices)){
segments(sommetX[indices[i,2]],sommetY[indices[i,2]],
sommetX[indices[i,3]],sommetY[indices[i,3]],col="grey")
text(mean(sommetX[indices[i,2:3]]),mean(sommetY[indices[i,2:3]]),
trunc(10000*coefficients(reg)[1+k+i])/10000)
}
for(i in 1:k){
cercle(c(cos(theta)[i]*1.18,sin(theta)[i]*1.18),.18,"grey")
text(cos(theta)[i]*1.35,sin(theta)[i]*1.35,
trunc(10000*coefficients(reg)[1+i])/10000)
}
points(sommetX,sommetY,cex=6,pch=19,col="yellow")
points(sommetX,sommetY,cex=6,pch=1)
text(sommetX,sommetY,1:k)

qui peut alors être comparé au graphique précédant

Avec 5 variables, on augmente les interactions possibles… même si beaucoup risquent d’être non-significatifs. On peut déjà se focaliser sur les paires possibles d’interactions croisées. Pour simplifier le code, on va utiliser deux fonctions locales,

vrepeach=function(x,e){
v=NULL
for(i in 1:length(e)){v=c(v,rep(x[i],each=e[i]))}
return(v)}
vreplength=function(x,l){
v=NULL
for(i in 1:length(l)){v=c(v,x[l[i]:length(x)])}
return(v)}

et ensuite, on adapte le code précédant

indices=cbind(1:(k*(k-1)/2),vrepeach(1:(k-1),(k-1):1),vreplength(2:k,1:(k-1)))
formule="Y~1"
for(i in 1:k) formule=paste(formule,"+X",i,sep="")
for(i in 1:nrow(indices)) formule=paste(formule,"+X",indices[i,2],":X",indices[i,3],sep="")
reg=glm(formule,data=db,family=binomial)
theta=pi/2+2*pi*(0:(k-1))/k
sommetX=cos(theta)
sommetY=sin(theta)
plot(sommetX,sommetY,cex=1,axes=FALSE,xlab="",ylab="",xlim=c(-1.5,1.5),ylim=c(-1.5,1.5))
for(i in 1:nrow(indices)){
segments(sommetX[indices[i,2]],sommetY[indices[i,2]],
sommetX[indices[i,3]],sommetY[indices[i,3]],col="grey")
text(mean(sommetX[indices[i,2:3]]),mean(sommetY[indices[i,2:3]]),
trunc(10000*coefficients(reg)[1+k+i])/10000)
}
for(i in 1:k){
cercle(c(cos(theta)[i]*1.18,sin(theta)[i]*1.18),.18,"grey")
text(cos(theta)[i]*1.35,sin(theta)[i]*1.35,
trunc(10000*coefficients(reg)[1+i])/10000)
}
points(sommetX,sommetY,cex=6,pch=19,col="yellow")
points(sommetX,sommetY,cex=6,pch=1)
text(sommetX,sommetY,1:k)

ce qui donne un schéma plus complexe,

On peut aussi prendre juste 2 variables, prenant 3 et 4 modalités respectivement. On va extraire deux variables indicatrices pour la première (la modalité restante sera la modalité de référence) et trois pour la seconde,

db=data.frame(Y=GermanCredit$class-1,
X1=GermanCredit$checking_status=="A12",
X2=GermanCredit$checking_status=="A13",
X3=GermanCredit$checking_status=="A14",
X4=GermanCredit$employment%in%c("A72","A73"),
X5=GermanCredit$employment%in%c("A74","A75"))
k=5
indices=cbind(1:(k*(k-1)/2),vrepeach(1:(k-1),(k-1):1),vreplength(2:k,1:(k-1)))
formule="Y~1"
for(i in 1:k) formule=paste(formule,"+X",i,sep="")
for(i in 1:nrow(indices)) formule=paste(formule,"+X",indices[i,2],":X",indices[i,3],sep="")
reg=glm(formule,data=db,family=binomial)
theta=pi/2+2*pi*(0:(k-1))/k
sommetX=cos(theta)
sommetY=sin(theta)
plot(sommetX,sommetY,cex=1,axes=FALSE,xlab="",ylab="",xlim=c(-1.5,1.5),ylim=c(-1.5,1.5))
for(i in 1:nrow(indices)){
if(!is.na(coefficients(reg)[1+k+i])){
segments(sommetX[indices[i,2]],sommetY[indices[i,2]],
sommetX[indices[i,3]],sommetY[indices[i,3]],col="grey")
text(mean(sommetX[indices[i,2:3]]),mean(sommetY[indices[i,2:3]]),
trunc(10000*coefficients(reg)[1+k+i])/10000)
}}
for(i in 1:k){
cercle(c(cos(theta)[i]*1.18,sin(theta)[i]*1.18),.18,"grey")
text(cos(theta)[i]*1.35,sin(theta)[i]*1.35,
trunc(10000*coefficients(reg)[1+i])/10000)
}
points(sommetX,sommetY,cex=6,pch=19,col="yellow")
points(sommetX,sommetY,cex=6,pch=1)
text(sommetX,sommetY,1:k)

On voit que plusieurs interactions ne sont alors plus possibles, sur la partie gauche (les trois modalités de la même variable) et sur la partie droite

On peut d’ailleurs simplifier les graphs, en ne visualisant que les interactions significatives.

indices=cbind(1:(k*(k-1)/2),vrepeach(1:(k-1),(k-1):1),vreplength(2:k,1:(k-1)))
formule="Y~1"
for(i in 1:k) formule=paste(formule,"+X",i,sep="")
for(i in 1:nrow(indices)) formule=paste(formule,"+X",indices[i,2],":X",indices[i,3],sep="")
reg=glm(formule,data=db,family=binomial)
theta=pi/2+2*pi*(0:(k-1))/k
sommetX=cos(theta)
sommetY=sin(theta)
plot(sommetX,sommetY,cex=1,axes=FALSE,xlab="",ylab="",xlim=c(-1.5,1.5),ylim=c(-1.5,1.5))
for(i in 1:nrow(indices)){
if(!is.na(coefficients(reg)[1+k+i])){
if(summary(reg)$coefficients[1+k+i,4]<.1){
segments(sommetX[indices[i,2]],sommetY[indices[i,2]],
sommetX[indices[i,3]],sommetY[indices[i,3]],col="grey")
text(mean(sommetX[indices[i,2:3]]),mean(sommetY[indices[i,2:3]]),
trunc(10000*coefficients(reg)[1+k+i])/10000)
}}}
for(i in 1:k){
if(summary(reg)$coefficients[1+i]<.1){
cercle(c(cos(theta)[i]*1.18,sin(theta)[i]*1.18),.18,"grey")
text(cos(theta)[i]*1.35,sin(theta)[i]*1.35,
trunc(10000*coefficients(reg)[1+i])/10000)
}}
points(sommetX,sommetY,cex=6,pch=19,col="yellow")
points(sommetX,sommetY,cex=6,pch=1)
text(sommetX,sommetY,1:k)

soit ici

Ici, une seule interactions croisée est significative, et presque toutes les variables le sont. Et si on reprend le modèle avec 5 facteurs,

db=data.frame(Y=GermanCredit$class-1,X1=GermanCredit$checking_status%in%c("A12","A13"),
X2=GermanCredit$credit_history%in%c("A30","A31"),
X3=GermanCredit$savings%in%c("A61","A62"),
X4=GermanCredit$employment%in%c("A71","A72"),
X5=GermanCredit$other_payment_plans=="A143")

indices=cbind(1:(k*(k-1)/2),vrepeach(1:(k-1),(k-1):1),vreplength(2:k,1:(k-1)))
formule="Y~1"
for(i in 1:k) formule=paste(formule,"+X",i,sep="")
for(i in 1:nrow(indices)) formule=paste(formule,"+X",indices[i,2],":X",indices[i,3],sep="")
reg=glm(formule,data=db,family=binomial)
theta=pi/2+2*pi*(0:(k-1))/k
sommetX=cos(theta)
sommetY=sin(theta)
plot(sommetX,sommetY,cex=1,axes=FALSE,xlab="",ylab="",xlim=c(-1.5,1.5),ylim=c(-1.5,1.5))
for(i in 1:nrow(indices)){
if(!is.na(coefficients(reg)[1+k+i])){
if(summary(reg)$coefficients[1+k+i,4]<.1){
segments(sommetX[indices[i,2]],sommetY[indices[i,2]],
sommetX[indices[i,3]],sommetY[indices[i,3]],col="grey")
text(mean(sommetX[indices[i,2:3]]),mean(sommetY[indices[i,2:3]]),
trunc(10000*coefficients(reg)[1+k+i])/10000)
}}}
for(i in 1:k){
if(summary(reg)$coefficients[1+i]<.1){
cercle(c(cos(theta)[i]*1.18,sin(theta)[i]*1.18),.18,"grey")
text(cos(theta)[i]*1.35,sin(theta)[i]*1.35,
trunc(10000*coefficients(reg)[1+i])/10000)
}}
points(sommetX,sommetY,cex=6,pch=19,col="yellow")
points(sommetX,sommetY,cex=6,pch=1)
text(sommetX,sommetY,1:k)

on obtient

Je ne sais pas si mes graphiques sont pertinents, ou pas. Mais je trouve ça joli. En fait, je suis tombé un peu par hasard2 sur les Tables de Taguchi, développées par Gen’ichi Taguchi (田口 玄一). Le soucis est que je n’ai rien compris… Enfin, disons que je croyais comprendre, puis j’ai continué à faire des dessins… Si quelqu’un pourrait m’expliquer sur mon exemple les graphiques de Taguchi, je suis preneur ! car je doute que ce soit ce que je fais depuis tout à l’heure…

1. Cette base est largement utilisée dans le quatrième chapitre de Computational Actuarial Science with R, à paraître dans les mois à venir.

2.En l’occurence, le hasard est @Benavent qui a suscité ma curiosité ce matin en me parlant de ces tables, dont je n’avais alors jamais entendu parlé ! J’avais même lu rapidement Taniguchi (谷口 ジロー) et je ne voyais pas le rapport avec les statistiques….

Non-observable vs. observable heterogeneity factor

This morning, in the ACT2040 class (on non-life insurance), we’ve discussed the difference between observable and non-observable heterogeneity in ratemaking (from an economic perspective). To illustrate that point (we will spend more time, later on, discussing observable and non-observable risk factors), we looked at the following simple example. Let  denote the height of a person. Consider the following dataset

> Davis=read.table(
+ "http://socserv.socsci.mcmaster.ca/jfox/Books/Applied-Regression-2E/datasets/Davis.txt")

There is a small typo in the dataset, so let us make manual changes here

> Davis[12,c(2,3)]=Davis[12,c(3,2)] 

Here, the variable of interest is the height of a given person,

> X=Davis$height 

If we look at the histogram, we have

> hist(X,col="light green", border="white",proba=TRUE,xlab="",main="")

Can we assume that we have a Gaussian distribution ?

Maybe not… Here, if we fit a Gaussian distribution, plot it, and add a kernel based estimator, we get

> (param <- fitdistr(X,"normal")$estimate) 
> f1 <- function(x) dnorm(x,param[1],param[2]) 
> x=seq(100,210,by=.2) 
> lines(x,f1(x),lty=2,col="red") 
> lines(density(X))

 

If you look at that black line, you might think of a mixture, i.e. something like

(using standard mixture notations). Mixture are obtained when we have a non-observable heterogeneity factor: with probability , we have a random variable  (call it type [1]), and with probability , a random variable  (call it type [2]). So far, nothing new. And we can fit such a mixture distribution, using e.g.


> library(mixtools) 
> mix <- normalmixEM(X)
 number of iterations= 335 
> (param12 <- c(mix$lambda[1],mix$mu,mix$sigma)) 
[1] 0.4002202 178.4997298 165.2703616 6.3561363 5.9460023  

If we plot that mixture of two Gaussian distributions, we get

> f2 <- function(x){ param12[1]*dnorm(x,param12[2],param12[4])
+ (1-param12[1])*dnorm(x,param12[3],param12[5]) }
> lines(x,f2(x),lwd=2, col="red") lines(density(X))

Not bad. Actually, we can try to maximize the likelihood with our own codes,

> logdf <- function(x,parameter){
+ p <- parameter[1]
+ m1 <- parameter[2]
+ s1 <- parameter[4]
+ m2 <- parameter[3]
+ s2 <- parameter[5]
+ return(log(p*dnorm(x,m1,s1)+(1-p)*dnorm(x,m2,s2)))
+ }
> logL <- function(parameter) -sum(logdf(X,parameter))
> Amat <- matrix(c(1,-1,0,0,0,0,
+ 0,0,0,0,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1), 4, 5)
> bvec <- c(0,-1,0,0)
> constrOptim(c(.5,160,180,10,10), logL, NULL, ui = Amat, ci = bvec)$par

[1]   0.5996263 165.2690084 178.4991624   5.9447675   6.3564746

Here, we include some constraints, to insurance that the probability belongs to the unit interval, and that the variance parameters remain positive. Note that we have something close to the previous output.

Let us try something a little bit more complex now. What if we assume that the underlying distributions have the same variance, namely

In that case, we have to use the previous code, and make small changes,

> logdf <- function(x,parameter){
+ p <- parameter[1]
+ m1 <- parameter[2]
+ s1 <- parameter[4]
+ m2 <- parameter[3]
+ s2 <- parameter[4]
+ return(log(p*dnorm(x,m1,s1)+(1-p)*dnorm(x,m2,s2)))
+ }
> logL <- function(parameter) -sum(logdf(X,parameter))
> Amat <- matrix(c(1,-1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1), 3, 4)
> bvec <- c(0,-1,0)
> (param12c= constrOptim(c(.5,160,180,10), logL, NULL, ui = Amat, ci = bvec)$par)

[1]   0.6319105 165.6142824 179.0623954   6.1072614

This is what we can do if we cannot observe the heterogeneity factor. But wait… we actually have some information in the dataset. For instance, we have the sex of the person. Now, if we look at histograms of height per sex, and kernel based density estimator of the height, per sex, we have

So, it looks like the height for male, and the height for female are different. Maybe we can use that variable, that was actually observed, to explain the heterogeneity in our sample. Formally, here, the idea is to consider a mixture, with an observable heterogeneity factor: the sex,

We now have interpretation of what we used to call class [1] and [2] previously: male and female. And here, estimating parameters is quite simple,

>  (pM <- mean(sex=="M"))
[1] 0.44
>  (paramF <- fitdistr(X[sex=="F"],"normal")$estimate)
      mean         sd 
164.714286   5.633808 
>  (paramM <- fitdistr(X[sex=="M"],"normal")$estimate)
      mean         sd 
178.011364   6.404001

And if we plot the density, we have

> f4 <- function(x) pM*dnorm(x,paramM[1],paramM[2])+(1-pM)*dnorm(x,paramF[1],paramF[2])
> lines(x,f4(x),lwd=3,col="blue")

What if, once again, we assume identical variance? Namely, the model becomes

Then a natural idea to derive an estimator for the variance, based on previous computations, is to use

The code is here

> s=sqrt((sum((height[sex=="M"]-paramM[1])^2)+sum((height[sex=="F"]-paramF[1])^2))/(nrow(Davis)-2))
> s
[1] 6.015068

and again, it is possible to plot the associated density,

> f5 <- function(x) pM*dnorm(x,paramM[1],s)+(1-pM)*dnorm(x,paramF[1],s)
> lines(x,f5(x),lwd=3,col="blue")

Now, if we think a little about what we’ve just done, it is simply a linear regression on a factor, the sex of the person,

where .  And indeed, if we run the code to estimate this linear model,

> summary(lm(height~sex,data=Davis))

Call:
lm(formula = height ~ sex, data = Davis)

Residuals:
     Min       1Q   Median       3Q      Max 
-16.7143  -3.7143  -0.0114   4.2857  18.9886 

Coefficients:
            Estimate Std. Error t value Pr(>|t|)    
(Intercept) 164.7143     0.5684  289.80   <2e-16 ***
sexM         13.2971     0.8569   15.52   <2e-16 ***
---
Signif. codes:  0 '***' 0.001 '**' 0.01 '*' 0.05 '.' 0.1 ' ' 1

Residual standard error: 6.015 on 198 degrees of freedom
Multiple R-squared:  0.5488,	Adjusted R-squared:  0.5465 
F-statistic: 240.8 on 1 and 198 DF,  p-value: < 2.2e-16

we get the same estimators for the means and the variance as the ones obtained previously. So, as mentioned this morning in class, if you have a non-observable heterogeneity factor, we can use a mixture model to fit a distribution, but if you can get a proxy of that factor, that is observable, then you can run a regression. But most of the time, that observable variable is just a proxy of a non-observable one…

Propriétés des estimateurs dans une régression

Comme les rappels (je devrais plutôt dire “remise à niveau“) ont été particulièrement rapides, je vais prendre un peu de temps pour revenir sur quelques éléments du cours d’économétrie (d’autant plus que j’ai reçu quelques questions par mail).

  • sur le calcul des estimateurs

Je vais reprendre les questions que j’ai reçu, ça sera plus simple, “je comprend pas très bien quelle méthode utilise l’opération lm(Y~X…..) sur R pour trouver les coef” ou encore “je regresse un modèle simple, je sors le summary, et j’obtiens un betaREG 3 étoiles. Toujours sur R, je compare ce betaREG avec le betaCalc = (X’X)-1 * X’Y, il est différent ! Comment expliquer cela ? Est-ce possible ?“.
Commençons par la première question: la fonction lm() utilise la méthode dite des moindres carrés, ce qui revient à calculer

en adoptant une écriture matricielle, i.e. la solution est alors

Cet estimateur est celui qui minimise la somme des carrés des erreurs. Et on peut vérifier numériquement que cet estimateur est bien celui calculé par R,

>data(cars)
>X=cbind(rep(1,nrow(cars)),cars$speed); Y=cars$dist
> X[1:5,]
      [,1] [,2]
 [1,]    1    4
 [2,]    1    4
 [3,]    1    7
 [4,]    1    7
 [5,]    1    8
> solve(t(X)%*%X)
            [,1]         [,2]
[1,]  0.19310949 -0.011240876
[2,] -0.01124088  0.000729927
> t(X)%*%Y
      [,1]
[1,]  2149
[2,] 38482
> (solve(t(X)%*%X))%*%(t(X)%*%Y)
           [,1]
[1,] -17.579095
[2,]   3.932409

ce qui correspond très précisément à ce que calcule la fonction de R

> lm(dist~speed,cars)
Coefficients:
(Intercept)        speed 
    -17.579        3.932

Et on peut aussi vérifier qu’il minimise bien la somme des carrés des erreurs,

> b0=seq(-30,10,by=3);
> b1=seq(1,7,by=.5)
> SC=matrix(NA,length(b0),length(b1))
> for(i in 1:length(b0)){
> for(j in 1:length(b1)){
 + SC[i,j]=sum((cars$dist-(b0[i]+b1[j]*cars$speed))^2)
}}
> contour(b0,b1,SC)

et je peux certifier que la valeur obtenue est bien le minimum de cette fonction (en fait c’est un résultat théorique d’optimisation).
Ca se généralise bien entendu en dimension plus grande. Alors attention, cette formule permet de calculer un estimateur du vecteur des paramètres, mais la formule est bien sûre fausse si on raisonne composante par composante.

> X=cars$speed; Y=cars$dist
> (solve(t(X)%*%X))%*%(t(X)%*%Y)
         [,1]
[1,] 2.909132

Mais ça c’est un résultat (trivial) d’algèbre linéaire. En effet, le fait d’avoir

ne signifie pas que l’on ait ce genre de formule composante par composante, i.e.

Dit de manière un peu formelle, le produit matriciel n’est pas un produit terme à terme. La traduction économétrique de cette idée est qu’une régression multiple n’est pas une succession de régressions simples. En effet, dans l’équation précédante, le dernier terme correspond à la régression sans la constante, comme on peut le voir ci-dessous

> lm(dist~0+speed,cars)
Coefficients:
speed  
2.909

et le premier est tout simplement la moyenne empirique,

> lm(dist~1,cars)
Coefficients:
(Intercept)  
      42.98  
> mean(cars$dist)
[1] 42.98
> X=rep(1,nrow(cars)); Y=cars$dist
> (solve(t(X)%*%X))%*%(t(X)%*%Y)
      [,1]
[1,] 42.98
  • sur les propriétés des estimateurs

Une question était “doit-on vérifier les propriétés de l’estimateur (sans biais, efficace etc…) du summary de la Reg ? pour chaque régression ?
Bon, la réponse est non car c’est impossible ! Pour répéter tranquillement ce que j’avais dit plusieurs fois oralement: quand on fait un modèle (théorique), on part d’hypothèses (par exemple ici les résidus sont centrées, de variance constante). Sous ces hypothèses on a des propriétés: ce sont des théorèmes, autrement dit de la théorie. Le plus connu étant le théorème de Gauss-Markov sur le modèle linéaire, qui garantie que l’estimateur par moindre carré est BLUE (best linear unbiased estimator).
Autrement dit (si je retraduit ce que dit ce théorème), si les hypothèses sont valides, alors la théorie nous garantie que les estimateurs vérifient des propriétés, dont celle d’être sans biais, par exemple.
On ne
peut pas
vérifier qu’un estimateur est sans biais, on peut juste vérifier ex post que les hypothèses sont valides (ou non), ce qui garantit (ou pas) l’absence de biais.
Mais comme on va le voir par la suite, le biais ce n’est pas forcément gênant, ce qui est important, c’est surtout la convergence. Comme le notait Clive Granger  “if you can’t even get a consistant estimator, you shouldn’t be in this business“.

  • et sur des points plus théoriques

sinon la personne qui avait des soucis numériques à calculer les coefficients me demandait si cela avait un “rapport avec les plim X’E/n et plim (X’X)-1/ n“.
Pour revenir sur ce point, une hypothèse forte dans le modèle linéaire (de base) est que le bruit soit soit un vrai bruit, c’est à dire non corrélé avec la variable explicative, i.e.

https://perso.univ-rennes1.fr/arthur.charpentier/latex/latex-reponse-mail-1.png

En effet, sinon

https://perso.univ-rennes1.fr/arthur.charpentier/latex/latex-reponse-mail-2.png

autrement dit l’estimateur par moindre carré est biasé. La solution la plus naturelle pour éviter ce “problème” est d’utiliser un instrument (ou une variable instrumentale).
Mais surtout, sur cet exemple, on voit qu’on ne pourra avoir la convergence de notre estimateur par moindres carrés que si la corrélation entre le bruit et la variable explicative tend vers 0 asymptotiquement.
Il existe en effet une différence fondamentale entre le biais et la consistance (ou la convergence vers la vraie valeur).

  • un estimateur sans biais est généralement convergent (et de manière consistante)
  • un estimateur biaisé peut ne pas converger

Prenons un petit exemple pour illustrer ces points. On supposera n1 < n2 < n3par la suite. Comme je l’ai expliqué auparavant, la distribution de l’estimateur est une propriété théorique qui ne peut se voir sur un jeu de données (à moins de faire des simulations mais ça sort du cadre de mon billet d’aujourd’hui). La figure ci-dessous correspond au cas sans biais, et convergent

https://blogperso.univ-rennes1.fr/arthur.charpentier/public/perso2/.graph-estimateur-sans-biais-convergent_m.jpg

La figure ci-dessous correspond au cas biaisé, mais convergent, et consistant, au sens où asymptotiquement, l’estimateur sera sans biais.

https://blogperso.univ-rennes1.fr/arthur.charpentier/public/perso2/.graph-estimateur-biais-convergent_m.jpg

Enfin, un dernier cas correspondant au cas biaisé, convergent, mais non consistant. Asymptotiquement l’estimateur sera toujours biaisé,
https://blogperso.univ-rennes1.fr/arthur.charpentier/public/perso2/.graph-estimateur-biais-non-convergent_m.jpg

Mais revenons un peu sur la formaliation sous-jacente au modèle linéaire. Les propriétés sur les résidus sont conditionnelles aux variables explicatives, en particulier.

https://perso.univ-rennes1.fr/arthur.charpentier/latex/latex-reponse-mail-3.png
https://perso.univ-rennes1.fr/arthur.charpentier/latex/latex-reponse-mail-4.png

(c’est l’hypothèse d’homoscédasticité et d’indépendance des résidus). Bon, il faut aussi l’absence de relation linéaire entre les variables explicatives, ce qui se traduit parfois comme une absence de collinéarité.
On peut s’intéresser aux propriétés asymptotiques de l’estimateur. Pour cela, il faut peut être rappeler ce que signifie la convergence pour une variable aléatoire (en statistique mathématique, les estimateurs sont vus comme des variables aléatoires). On dira que https://perso.univ-rennes1.fr/arthur.charpentier/latex/latex-reponse-mail-5.png converge en probabilité vers https://perso.univ-rennes1.fr/arthur.charpentier/latex/latex-reponse-mail-6.png, parfois noté

https://perso.univ-rennes1.fr/arthur.charpentier/latex/latex-reponse-mail-7.png

si

https://perso.univ-rennes1.fr/arthur.charpentier/latex/latex-reponse-mail-8.png

Par exemple la loi des grands nombres garantie que, pour un échantillon i.i.d.

https://perso.univ-rennes1.fr/arthur.charpentier/latex/latex-reponse-mail-9.png

si l’espérance des variables est finie, alors

https://perso.univ-rennes1.fr/arthur.charpentier/latex/latex-reponse-mail-10.png

Alors sous les hypothèses mentionnées auparavant, on peut montrer que, dans le modèle linéaire,

https://perso.univ-rennes1.fr/arthur.charpentier/latex/latex-reponse-mail-11.png

On parlera alors d’estimateur convergent. On peut aussi montrer que

https://perso.univ-rennes1.fr/arthur.charpentier/latex/latex-reponse-mail-12.png

Mais formellement,

https://perso.univ-rennes1.fr/arthur.charpentier/latex/latex-reponse-mail-13.png

si

https://perso.univ-rennes1.fr/arthur.charpentier/latex/latex-reponse-mail-14.png

Voilà en gros quelques éléments pour répondre aux questions, mais tout ça sera repris en détails dans le cours d’économétrie 1 qui commencera très bientôt… et surtout d’économétrie 2 qui abordera les aspects dynamiques.